The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia Learning

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Richard E. Mayer
Cambridge University Press, Aug 15, 2005 - Education - 663 pages
2 Reviews
In the last decade, the field of multimedia learning emerged as a coherent discipline with an accumulated research base that had never been synthesized and organized in a handbook. The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia Learning, first published in 2005, constituted the world's first handbook devoted to comprehensive coverage of research and theory in the field of multimedia learning. Multimedia learning is defined as learning from words (e.g., spoken or printed text) and pictures (e.g. illustrations, photos, maps, graphs, animation, or video). The focus of this handbook is on how people learn from words and pictures in computer-based environments. Multimedia environments include online instructional presentations, interactive lessons, e-courses, simulation games, virtual reality, and computer-supported in-class presentations. The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia Learning seeks to establish what works (that is, to ground research in cognitive theory), and to consider when and where it works (that is, to explore the implications of research for practice).
  

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multimedia do not increase learning

Review: The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia Learning (Cambridge Handbooks in Psychology)

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Helped me a lot in my dissertation Read full review

Contents

Implications of Cognitive Load Theory for Multimedia Learning
19
Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning
31
An Integrated Model of Text and Picture Comprehension
49
The FourComponent Instructional Design Model Multimedia Principles in Environments for Complex Learning
71
Five Common but Questionable Principles of Multimedia Learning
97
The Multimedia Principle
117
The SplitAttention Principle in Multimedia Learning
135
The Modality Principle in Multimedia Learning
147
Prior Knowledge Principle in Multimedia Learning
325
The Cognitive Aging Principle in Multimedia Learning
339
Multimedia Learning of Reading
355
Multimedia Learning of History
375
Multimedia Learning of Mathematics
393
Multimedia Learning of Chemistry
409
Multimedia Learning of Meteorology
429
Multimedia Learning About Physical Systems
447

The Redundancy Principle in Multimedia Learning
159
Principles for Managing Essential Processing in Multimedia Learning Segmenting Pretraining and Modality Principles
169
Principles for Reducing Extraneous Processing in Multimedia Learning Coherence Signaling Redundancy Spatial Contiguity and Temporal Contiguit...
183
Principles of Multimedia Learning Based on Social Cues Personalization Voice and Image Principles
201
The Guided Discovery Principle in Multimedia Learning
215
The WorkedOut Examples Principle in Multimedia Learning
229
The Collaboration Principle in Multimedia Learning
247
The SelfExplanation Principle in Multimedia Learning
271
The Animation and Interactivity Principles in Multimedia Learning
287
Navigational Principles in Multimedia Learning
297
The Site Map Principle in Multimedia Learning
313
Multimedia Learning in Second Language Acquisition
467
Multimedia Learning of Cognitive Skills
489
Multimedia Learning with Animated Pedagogical Agents
507
Multimedia Learning in Virtual Reality
525
Multimedia Learning in Games Simulations and Microworlds
549
Multimedia Learning with Hypermedia
569
Multimedia Learning in eCourses
589
Author Index
617
Subject Index
635
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Page 8 - Books will soon be obsolete in the schools. Scholars will soon be instructed through the eye. It is possible to teach every branch of human knowledge with the motion picture. Our school system will be completely changed in ten years.

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About the author (2005)

Richard E. Mayer is Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara where he has served since 1975. He is the author of 18 books and more than 250 articles and chapters, including Multimedia Learning (2001), E-Learning and the Science of Instruction (2003) with Ruth Clark, and Learning and Instruction (2003).

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