Gone With the Wind

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1936 - Women - 1037 pages
168 Reviews
Margaret Mitchell's epic novel of love and war won the Pulitzer Prize and went on to give rise to two authorized sequels and one of the most popular and celebrated movies of all time.

Many novels have been written about the Civil War and its aftermath. None take us into the burning fields and cities of the American South as Gone With the Wind does, creating haunting scenes and thrilling portraits of characters so vivid that we remember their words and feel their fear and hunger for the rest of our lives.

In the two main characters, the white-shouldered, irresistible Scarlett and the flashy, contemptuous Rhett, Margaret Mitchell not only conveyed a timeless story of survival under the harshest of circumstances, she also created two of the most famous lovers in the English-speaking world since Romeo and Juliet.

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I am a sucker for a happy, well rounded ending. - Goodreads
Not the happy ending I expected. - Goodreads
It's a wonderful drama, but the writing spoils it. - Goodreads
I want a better ending. - Goodreads
That says a great deal for the writing itself. - Goodreads
And you know what, it's a perfect ending. - Goodreads

Review: Gone with the Wind

User Review  - Larry - Goodreads

Who would have thought that a 1037-page, 80-year-old novel about a spoiled, petulant teenager in petticoats would completely suck me in, and turn out to be one of the greatest novels of all time ... Read full review

Review: Gone with the Wind

User Review  - Ginger - Goodreads

This book is worth the time investment to get through the 1000-plus pages. I thought it might be a bit melodramatic or dated (like the movie), but it wasn't at all. The story quickly engaged me. If ... Read full review

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About the author (1936)

Margaret Mitchell, 1900 - 1949 Novelist Margaret Mitchell was born November 8, 1900 in Atlanta, Georgia to Eugene Muse Mitchell, a prominent attorney, and Maybelle Stephens Mitchell, a suffragette. She attended Smith College from 1918-1919 to study psychiatry, but she had to return to Atlanta when her mother died during the great flu epidemic of 1918. In 1922, she married Red Upshaw but left him three months later and had the marriage annulled. In 1925, she married John Marsh, the best man at her first wedding. He died in 1952. Mitchell joined the prestigious Debutante Club, but her public drinking, smoking and her performance of an Apache dance in a sensual costume, ended that for her. She was refused membership to the Atlanta Junior League. She began her writing career as a feature writer for the Atlanta Journal. She authored a freelance column for the paper called Elizabeth Bennett's Gossip. Mitchell is the author of the best selling novel of all time, "Gone with the Wind" (1936). In 1939, the film version was a smash hit and it received ten Academy Awards. Scarlett's original name was Pansy, which was also the book's working title, but editors insisted that it would be changed because of its use in the North to refer to homosexuals. Other early titles of the book were "Tote the Weary Load" and "Tomorrow Is Another Day." It is believed that the character Rhett Butler was inspired by her first husband Red Upshaw, and the character Ashley Wilkes was inspired by her first fiance, the attractive and idealistic Lieutenant Clifford Henry. Henry was killed in France during World War I and Mitchell declared him as the one great love of her life. On August 16, 1949, Margaret Mitchell died of injuries she received when she was hit by an intoxicated cabdriver while crossing Peachtree Street in Atlanta. She was mourned by so many that tickets had to be distributed for the funeral. Published posthumously was "Lost Laysen" (1996), which was a novella Mitchell wrote in 1915, at the age of fifteen, as a gift for her boyfriend.

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