History of Spanish literature, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Houghton, Mifflin and company, 1849 - Spanish literature
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Page 252 - And Castillo, another chronicler, tells us gravely, in 1587, that Philip the Second, when he married Mary of England, only forty years earlier promised that if King Arthur should return to claim the throne he would peaceably yield to that prince all his rights; thus implying, at least in Castillo himself, and probably in many of his readers a full faith in the stories of Arthur and his Round Table.
Page 467 - ... bore everywhere marks of the subjection to which the press and those who wrote for it were alike reduced. From the abject titlepages and dedications of the authors themselves, through the crowd of certificates collected from their friends to establish the orthodoxy of works that were often as little connected with religion as fairy tales, down to the colophon, supplicating pardon for any unconscious neglect of the authority of the Church or any too free use of classical mythology, we are continually...
Page 215 - World as well as the Old, is unrivalled in richness, in variety, and in picturesque and poetical elements. In truth, the chronicles of no other nation can, on such points, be compared to them ; not even the Portuguese, which approach the nearest in original and early materials; nor the French, which, in Joinville and Froissart, make the highest claims in another direction. For these old Spanish chronicles, whether they have their foundations in truth or in fable, always strike farther down than those...
Page 19 - Their shields before their breasts, forth at once they go, Their lances in the rest, levelled fair and low, Their banners and their crests waving in a row, Their heads all stooping down toward the saddle-bow. The Cid was in the midst, his shout was heard afar : " I am Rui Diaz, the champion of Bivar ! Strike among them, gentlemen, for sweet mercy's sake...
Page 52 - doth signify a cruel lord, who, by force or by craft, or by treachery, hath obtained power over any realm or country; and such men be of such nature, that when once they have grown strong in the land, they love rather to work their own profit, though it be...
Page 19 - As many more lay slain. You might see them raise their lances, And level them again. There you might see the breastplates, How they were cleft in twain, And many a Moorish...
Page 17 - And finally, the metre and rhyme into which the whole poem is cast are rude and unsettled ; the verse claiming to be of fourteen syllables, divided by an abrupt caesural pause after the eighth, yet often running out to sixteen or twenty, and sometimes falling back to twelve ; but always bearing the impress of a free and fearless...
Page 215 - As we close it up, (he says—speaking of an old chronicle he has been criticizing.) — we should not forget, that the whole series, extending over full two hundred and fifty years, from the time of Alfonso the Wise to the accession of Charles the Fifth, and covering the New World as well as the Old, is unrivalled in richness, in variety, and in picturesque and poetical elements. In truth, the chronicles of no other nation can, on such points, be compared to them ; not even the Portuguese, which...
Page 254 - ... and seemed so dangerous, that in 1553 they were prohibited from being printed, sold, or read in the American colonies ; and in 1555 the Cortes earnestly asked that the same prohibition might be extended to Spain itself, and that all the extant copies of romances of chivalry might be publicly burned. And finally, half a century later, the happiest work of the greatest genius Spain has produced bears witness on every page to the prevalence of an absolute fanaticism for books of chivalry, and becomes...
Page 150 - You take pleasure in sighs, In sad music delight ; With the dawning you rise, Yet sit up half the night. " When you take up your work, . You look vacant and stare, And gaze on your sampler, , But miss the stitch there.

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