Strangers to that Land: British Perceptions of Ireland from the Reformation to the Famine

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Rowman & Littlefield, Jan 1, 1994 - History - 315 pages
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Strangers to that Land is a critical anthology of English, Scottish and Welsh colonists' and travelers' accounts of Ireland and the Irish from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries, from the Reformation to the Famine. The anthology consists exclusively of eyewitness descriptions of Ireland given by writers using English who had never been to Ireland before and were seeing the country for the first time. Each extract, where necessary, is set in context and briefly explained. The result is a vivid, continuous record of Ireland as defined and judged by the British over a period of four centuries.
  

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Contents

PREFACE
1
INTRODUCTION
3
1 GIRALDUS CAMBRENSIS AND ENGLISH WRITING ABOUT IRELAND
25
2 JOHN BALE AND THE REFORMATION IN IRELAND
30
3 THE NATURE OF THE IRISH
36
4 THREE TRAVELLERS OBSERVATIONS OF IRISH LIFE
53
5 LAND AND LANDSCAPE
63
6 IRISH SOCIETY
73
1655 9
123
12 PASSAGE AND TRAVEL
134
13 THE SENSE OF DIFFERENCE
148
14 FROM WAR TO UNION
160
15 IRISH LIFE AND CUSTOMS
187
16 IRISH TOWNS
219
17 PICTURESQUE AND ROMANTIC IRELAND
238
18 POVERTY AND FAMINE
251

7 HUGH ONEILL SECOND EARL OF TYRONE 15401616
88
8 WAR AND REBELLION
97
9 COLONISATION
108
10 THE REBELLION OF 1641
115

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About the author (1994)

Andrew Hadfield is a lecturer in Medieval and Renaissance English Literature at the University of Wales. John McVeagh is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Ulster at Coleraine, Ireland.

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