Nashville Business Directory, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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J.P Campbell, 1855 - Nashville (Tenn.)
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I have only briefly viewed this publication, in my attempt to obtain additional lineage information I was ablle to very quickly find another spellilng of my family last name and an address. This is wonderful if you perfer to do online searches like myself. Thank you so much...

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Page 134 - A poor man, with seldom more than a single pack-horse on which the wife and infant were carried, with a few clothes and bed-quilts, a skillet and a small sack of meal, was often seen wending his way along the narrow mountain trace, with a rifle upon his shoulder — the elder sons carrying an axe, a hoe, sometimes an auger and a saw, and the older daughters leading or carrying the smaller children.
Page 180 - Tuesday, llth of November last, about twelve o'clock, my station was attacked by about forty Indians. On so sudden a surprise, they were in almost every house before they were discovered. All the men belonging to the station were out, only Mr.
Page 180 - s house. I saved Snider, so the Indians did not get his scalp, but shot and tomahawked him in a barbarous manner. They also killed Ann King and her son James, and scalped my daughter Rebecca. I hope she will still recover. The Indians have killed whole families about here this fall. You may hear the cries of some persons for their friends daily. The engagement, commenced by the Indians at my house, continued about an hour, as the neighbours say.
Page 172 - On the 29th of December, John Haggard was killed and scalped about six miles from Nashville ; twelve balls were shot into him. His wife was killed by the Indians in the summer, and he left five children in poverty and wretchedness.
Page 139 - Senior S. Doak, DD, displayed great equanimity and heroism. She inquired for the bullet moulds, and was engaged, busily, in melting the lead and running bullets for different guns. A bullet from without, passing through the interstice between two logs of the station, struck the wall near her, and rebounding, rolled upon the floor. Snatching it up, and melting and moulding it quickly she carried it to her husband and said: "Here is a ball run out of the Indians' lead; send it back to them as quickly...
Page 176 - It.was hinted, by th« governor, said he, that it will be in the spring ; I suspect before that time. But it may be immaterial to us, considering our exposed situation, and the little protection we have. He pressed General Sevier to carry an expedition of fifteen hundred men into the Cherokee country before the ensuing spring. We shall see that the former idea, with whomsoever it may have originated, came to maturity in the following year; though, at this time, no one, for fear of the displeasure...
Page 167 - On the 2d April, 1790, the United States, in Congress assembled, by an act made for that special purpose, accepted the Deed, and what is now Tennessee, ceased to be a part of North Carolina. The separation, though once resisted as unfilial, disobedient and revolutionary, was now in accordance with the judgment and wishes of all — peaceable, dutiful, affectionate. The Old North State is yet held in grateful remembrance by every emigrant she has sent to Tennessee. And there and elsewhere, to the...
Page 179 - ... men guarded the mouth of the creek, while the troops above were killing and capturing those between the two parties. When Brown met the main body, he inquired if they had taken any prisoners, and was immediately conducted to a house in which a number of them had been fastened up. When he came to the door he was at once recognized by the captives, who appeared to be horror stricken — remembering, no doubt, that they had murdered his people in the same town, five years before. At length, one...
Page 167 - Notice is hereby given, that the new road from Campbell's station to Nashville, was opened on the 25th of September, and the guard attended at that time to escort such persons as were ready to proceed to Nashville ; that about sixty families went on...
Page 182 - ... law punish. He practised virtue, and encouraged it in others ; vice he discountenanced by precept and by example. His house, and all he had, were opened freely to the distressed of every condition. He loved his friends, and he held his enemies at defiance. To his wife he was indebted for a knowledge...

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