The Cambridge University Magazine, Volume 2, Issue 1 (Google eBook)

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W.P. Grant, 1843 - English literature
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Page 288 - Homer ruled as his demesne Vet did I never breathe its pure serene. Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold. Then felt 1 like some watcher of the skies, When a new planet swims into his ken; Or like stout Cortez, when with eagle eyes He stared at
Page 318 - PRO. You do look, my son, in a moved sort, As if you were dismay'd: be cheerful, sir: Our revels now are ended : these our actors, As I foretold you, were all spirits, and Are melted into air, into thin air : And, like the baseless fabrick of this vision, The cloud-clapt towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples,
Page 288 - heard Chapman speak out loud and bold. Then felt 1 like some watcher of the skies, When a new planet swims into his ken; Or like stout Cortez, when with eagle eyes He stared at the Pacific, and all his men Look'd at each other with a wild surmise,
Page 279 - either I must live, or bear no life ; The Fountain from the which my current runs, Or else dries up ; to be discarded thence, , Or keep it as a cistern for foul toads To knot and gender in. Turn thy complexion there, Patience, thou young and rose-lipped cherubim ; Aye, there, look grim as hell.
Page 658 - /.ion said, The Lord hath forsaken me, and my Lord hath forgotten me. Can a woman forget her sucking child, that she should not have compassion on the son of her womb.' yea, they may forget, yet will I not forget thee."— Isaiah xlix. 14,
Page 108 - And those happy climes that lie Where day never shuts his eye, Up in the broad fields of the sky: There I suck the liquid air All amidst the gardens fair Of Hesperus, and his daughters three That sing about the golden tree: Along the crisped shades and bowers
Page 471 - inspiration ; the mirrors of the gigantic shadows which futurity casts upon the present; the words which express what they understand not; the trumpets which sing to battle and feel not what they inspire; the influence which is moved not, but moves. Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world. In
Page 636 - There is sweet music here, that softer falls Than petals from blown roses on the grass, Or night-dews on still waters between walls Of shadowy granite, in a gleaming pass ; Music that gentlier on the spirit lies, Music that brings sweet sleep down from the
Page 665 - 1 Art thou aught else but place, degree, and form, Creating awe and fear in other men ? Wherein thou art less happy being fear'd What drink'st thou oft, instead of homage sweet, Than they in fearing. But poison'd flattery ? O be sick, great greatness, And bid thy ceremony give
Page 570 - Man's love is of man's life a thing apart, Tis woman's whole existence. Man may range The court, camp, church, the vessel, and the mart; Sword, gown, gain, glory, offer, in exchange, Pride, fame, ambition, to fill up his heart, And few there are whom these cannot estrange : Men have all these resources ; we but one— To love again, and be again undone.

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