More Than a Game: The Computer Game as Fictional Form

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Manchester University Press, Sep 6, 2003 - Computers - 176 pages
2 Reviews
Taking its cue from practices of reading texts in literary and cultural studies, this book considers the computer game as a new and emerging mode of contemporary storytelling. In a carefully organized study, Barry Atkins discusses questions of narrative and realism in four of the most significant games of the last decade: Tomb Raider, Half-Life, Close Combat and SimCity. This is a work for both the student of contemporary culture and those game-players who are interested in how computer games tell their stories.
  

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Review: More than a Game: The Computer Game as Fictional Form

User Review  - Risko - Goodreads

Page 45: The plot-markers that are encountered, then, inform the player or reader of the type of story to be told. The player then undertakes the telling of this small-scale story and is rewarded by ... Read full review

Review: More than a Game: The Computer Game as Fictional Form

User Review  - JA - Goodreads

Barry Atkins attempts to understand video games as fictional forms, and pursues this investigation through four "game-fictions", each of which is given a chapter: the adventure game Tomb Raider, the ... Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgements page
1
The postmodern temptation
8
Reading gamefictions
21
reading Tomb Raider
27
Tomb Raider as quest narrative
39
Beating the system
47
reading HalfLife
55
Welcome to Black Mesa
63
Counterfactual gameplay
102
reading SimCity
111
The many worlds of SimCity
118
SimCity limits
125
More than a game?
138
The shape of things to come
147
Glossary of gamespecific terms
157
Index
167

am a camera
78
reading Close Combat
86

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About the author (2003)

Barry Atkins is Lecturer in English and Senior Learning and Teaching Fellow at Manchester Metropolitan University.

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