The Book of Fate: Whereby All Questions May be Answered Respecting the Present and Future (Google eBook)

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Foulsham, 1887
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Page 70 - After the different packs have been duly examined and explained, as before described, they must again be gathered up, shuffled, &c., indeed, the whole operation repeated, after which the three cards forming " the surprise" are examined, and supposing them to be the Seven of Hearts, the Knave of Clubs, and the Queen of Spades, are to be thus interpreted, — "Seven of Hearts — Pleasant thoughts and friendly intentions— Knave of Clubs — of a dark young man — Queen of Spades — relative to...
Page 72 - ... and, lastly, by taking the cards at either extremity of the line and pairing them. • This being done, gather up the fifteen cards, shuffle, cut, and deal them so as to form three packs of each five cards. From each of these three packs withdraw the topmost card, and place them on the one laid aside to form "the surprise," thus forming four packs of four cards each.
Page 69 - Knave of Diamonds, the King of Diamonds, the Seven of Spades, the Queen of Spades, and the Seven of Clubs. These, by recollecting our previous instructions regarding the individual and relative signification of the cards, are easily interpreted as follows, — "The Knave of Clubs — A fair young man, possessed of no delicacy of feeling, who seeks to injure — the King of Diamonds — a fair man in uniform — Seven of Spades — and will succeed in causing him. some annoyance — the Queen of Spades—...
Page 83 - A fair man, hot tempered, obstinate and revengeful Queen of Diamonds. — A fair woman, fond of company and a coquette. Knave of Diamonds. — A near relation who considers only his own interests. Also a fair person's thoughts. Ten of Diamonds.— Money. Nine of Diamonds. — Shows that a person is fond of roving. Eight of Diamonds. — A marriage late in life. Seven of Diamonds. — Satire, evil speaking. Six of Diamonds. — Early marriage and widowhood. Five of Diamonds. — Unexpected news. Four...
Page 74 - Knave of Clubs, is a clever, enterprising young man — Ten of Diamonds — about to undertake a journey — Queen of Spades — for the purpose of visiting a widow — nine of Spades — but one or both of their lives will be endangered. No. 4. — The Twenty-one Cards. After having shuffled the thirty-two cards, and cut, or had them cut, with the left hand, withdraw from the pack the first eleven, and lay them on one side. The remainder — twenty-one in all — are to be again shuffled and cut....
Page 70 - for those who did not expect it," and will be composed of four cards ; let us say the Ten of Hearts, Nine of Clubs, Eight of Spades, and Ten of Diamonds, signifying-— "The Ten of...
Page 65 - Aces, <kc. — denotes that the person represented by that card runs the risk of a prison. It requires no great efforts to commit these significations to memory, but it must be remembered that they are but what the alphabet is to the printed book; a little attention and practice, however, will soon enable the learner to form these mystic letters into words, and words into phrases ; in other language, to assemble these cards together, and read the events, past and to come, their pictured faces pretend...
Page 69 - Now gather up the cards you have been using, shuffle, and cut them with the left hand, and proceed to make them into three packs by dealing one to the left, one in the middle, and one to the right; a fourth is laid aside to form a "surprise.
Page 72 - ... acting be among them. If not, the cards must be all gathered up, shuffled, cut, and dealt as before, and this must be repeated until the missing card makes its appearance in the pack chosen by the person it represents. Now proceed to explain them — first, by interpreting the meaning of any pairs, triplets, or quartettes among them ; then by counting them in sevens, going from right to left, and beginning with the card representing the person consulting you ; and lastly, by taking the cards...
Page 63 - Satire, mockery; reversed, a foolish scandal. NB — In order to know whether the Ace, Ten, Nine, Eight, and Seven of Diamonds are reversed, it is better to make a small pencil-mark on each, to show which is the top of the card.

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