The wisdom of God manifested in the works of the Creation (Google eBook)

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Page 397 - And I, brethren, could not speak unto you as unto spiritual, but as unto carnal, even as unto babes in Christ. I have fed you with milk, and not with meat : for hitherto ye were not able to bear it. Neither yet now are ye able.
Page 1 - He hath made every thing beautiful in his time: also he hath set the world in their heart, so that no man can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end.
Page 79 - Thou coveredst it with the deep as with a garment: the waters stood above the mountains. At thy rebuke they fled; at the voice of thy thunder they hasted away.
Page 51 - God neither, that he should avrov^yity itrann, set his own hand, as it were, to every work, and immediately do all the meanest and triflingest things himself drudgingly without making use of any inferior and subordinate instruments.
Page 227 - I have no need of thee ; nor the head to the feet, I have no need of .you.
Page 175 - Creation; as if there were no other end of any creature, but some way or other to be serviceable to man. . . . But though this be vulgarly received, yet wise men now-a-days think otherwise. Dr. Moore affirms, That creatures are made to enjoy themselves as well as to serve us.
Page 128 - ... their own, and which themselves are masters of, and that without deliberation and consultation, were to make them to be endued with a most perfect intellect, far transcending that of human reason ; whereas it is plain enough that brutes are not above consultation, but below it, and that these instincts of nature in them are nothing but a kind of fate upon them. "The migration of birds...
Page 183 - I am the LORD : that is my name : and my glory will I not give to another, neither my praise to graven images.
Page 172 - Let us endeavour to promote and increase this knowledge, and make new discoveries, not so much distrusting our own parts, or despairing of our own abilities, as to think that our industry can add nothing to the invention of our ancestors, or correct any of their mistakes. Let us not think that the bounds of science are fixed like Hercules' pillars, and inscribed with a ne plus ultra.
Page 238 - Man is always mending and altering his works ; but nature observes the same tenor, because her works are so perfect, that there is no place for amendments, nothing that can be reprehended. The most sagacious men in so many ages have not been able to find any flaw in these divinely contrived and formed machines ; no blot or error in this great volume of the world, as if any thing had been an imperfect essay at the first ; nothing that can be altered for the better ; nothing but if it were...

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