The Valachi Papers

Front Cover
Pocket Books (Mm), 1968 - Social Science - 285 pages
22 Reviews
The First Inside Account of the Mafia In the 1960s a disgruntled soldier in New York's Genovese Crime Family decided to spill his guts. His name was Joseph Valachi. Daring to break the Mob's code of silence for the first time, Valachi detailed the organization of organized crimefrom the capos, or bosses, of every Family, to the hit men who "clipped" rivals and turncoats. With a phenomenal memory for names, dates, addresses, phone numbers -- and where the bodies were buried -- Joe Valachi provided the chilling facts that led to the arrest and conviction of America's major crime figures. The rest is history. Never again would the Mob be protected by secrecy. For the Mafia, Valachi's name would become synonymous with betrayal. But his stunning exposÉ . broke the back of America's Cosa Nostra and stands I today as the classic about America's Mob, a fascinat ing tale of power and terror, big money, crime ... and murder.

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Review: The Valachi Papers

User Review  - Matt - Goodreads

If you are a true Mafia History buff, you should probably get this book out of the way for a point of reference. Peter Maas is a good author, and does a decent job framing this story. In the end Joe ... Read full review

Review: The Valachi Papers

User Review  - Christopher - Goodreads

I've always wanted to read this book, but just recently got around to it. This is a good book. A lot of the stories will have a familiar ring to them if you've seen the Godfather movies or any mafia ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
9
Section 3
25
Copyright

14 other sections not shown

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About the author (1968)

Peter Maas attended Duke University and served in the U. S. Navy during the Korean War. After the war, Maas became a journalist and wrote for such magazines as Look, Saturday Evening Post, and New York Magazine. Maas's nonfiction works include "The Valachi Papers," "Serpico," and "Underboss," all of which include behind the scene stories of the inner workings of the Mafia. He died on August 23, 2001.

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