The fall of Troy (Google eBook)

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W. Heinemann, 1913 - Trojan War - 627 pages
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Review: The Fall of Troy

User Review  - Joel - Goodreads

This epic poem, probably written in the mid-fourth century AD, picks up right where Homer's Iliad ends (the funeral of Hector). The poet, Quintus of Smyrna, weaves together strands of the story from ... Read full review

Review: The Fall of Troy

User Review  - Silvio Curtis - Goodreads

It turns out that even though the Epic Cycle about the Trojan War is lost, there's still an ancient poem covering everything after the Iliad to the end. Quintus of Smyrna wrote it around the 300's AD ... Read full review

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Page 109 - Friends, let a heart of valour in our breasts Awake! Let us be like our lords, who fight With foes for fatherland, for babes, for us, And never pause for breath in that stern strife! Let us too throne war's spirit in our hearts! Let us too face the fight which favoureth none! For we, we women, be not creatures cast In diverse mould from men: to us is given Such energy of life as stirs in them. Eyes have we like to theirs, and limbs: throughout Fashioned we are alike: one common light We look on,...
Page 55 - So spake he, and his ashen spear the son Of Peleus drew from that swift horse, and from Penthesileia in death's agony. Then steed and rider gasped their lives away Slain by one spear. Now from her head he plucked The helmet splendour-flashing like the beams Of the great sun, or Zeus' own glory-light. Then, there as fallen in dust and blood she lay, Rose, like the breaking of the dawn, to view 'Neath dainty-pencilled brows a lovely face, Lovely in death. The Argives thronged around, And all they saw...
Page 59 - ... Remembered how that many and many a son Of Zeus himself in many a war had died, Nor in their fall had Zeus availed them aught. Therefore he turned him from the Argives else, Down smitten by the blasting thunderbolt, With Titans in the nether gloom he had lain, Who dared defy the eternal will of Zeus. Then did the warrior sons of Argos strip With eager haste from corpses strown all round The blood-stained spoils. But ever Peleus...
Page 321 - ... o'er the wide sea-gulf they set or rise." Then kissed he him, nor sought to stay the feet Of him who panted for the clamour of war, Who smiled for pleasure and for eagerness To haste to the ship. Yet were his hurrying feet Stayed by his mother's pleading and her tears Still in those halls awhile. As some swift horse Is reined in by his rider, when he strains Unto the race-course, and he neighs, and champs The curbing bit, dashing his chest with foam, And his feet eager for the course are...
Page 39 - ... excelling Men in the grapple of fight? But the poet, aware as Tisiphone is not of the doom impending upon both the Trojan men and their Amazon allies, posits a prudent intervention by 'one voice of wisdom', the dissuasive Theano: For your strength Can never be as that of Danaan men, Men trained on daily battle. Amazons Have joyed in ruthless fight, in charging steeds From the beginning: all the toil of men Do they endure, and therefore evermore The spirit of the War-god thrills them through,...
Page 55 - ... mortally wounded her with a javelin blow to the jugular. The Fall of Troy gives an interesting account of how Achilles and his compatriots reacted as he strolled over to view his conquest The Warriors gazed, and in their hearts They prayed That fair and sweet like her their wives Might seem, Laid in the bed of love, when home they won. Yea, and Achilles' very heart was wrung With love's remorse to have slain a thing So sweet Who might have borne her home, his queenly bride, To Chariot-glorious...
Page 91 - Ay, and himself had been on his dear son Laid, numbered with the dead, had not the voice Of Memnon stayed him even in act to rush Upon him, for he reverenced in his heart The white hairs of an age-mate of his sire : " Ancient," he cried, " it were my shame to fight With one so much mine elder : I am not Blind unto honour. Verily I weened That this was some young warrior, when I saw Thee facing thus the foe. My bold heart hoped For contest worthy of mine hand and spear. Nay, draw thou back afar from...
Page 521 - Then, even as from destruction shrank the lads, Those deadly fangs had seized and ravined up The twain, outstretching to their sightless sire Agonized hands : no power to help had he.
Page 541 - Despite his fury of war, A moment paused his wrath, or haply a God Held back the sword a space, that that old man Might speak to his fierce foe one word of prayer. Piteously cried he, terror-overwhelmed: "I kneel before thee, whosoe'er thou be Of mighty Argives. Oh compassionate My suppliant hands! Abate thy wrath! To slay The young and valiant is a glorious thing; But if thou smite an old man, small renown Waits on thy prowess. Therefore turn from me Thine hands against young men, if thou dost hope...
Page 55 - Neath dainty-pencilled brows a lovely face, Lovely in death. The Argives thronged around, And all they saw and marvelled, for she seemed Like an Immortal. In her armour there Upon the earth she lay, and seemed the child Of Zeus, the tireless Huntress Artemis Sleeping, what time her feet forwearied are With following lions with her flying shafts Over the hills far-stretching. She was made A wonder of beauty even in her death By Aphrodite glorious-crowned, the Bride Of the strong War-god, to the end...

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