Integrative Psychotherapy: Toward a Comprehensive Christian Approach (Google eBook)

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InterVarsity Press, Aug 20, 2009 - Religion
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Mark McMinn and Clark Campbell present a new integrative model of psychotherapy that is grounded in Christian biblical and theological teaching and in a critical and constructive engagement with contemporary psychology. The authors provide both theoretical analysis and also practical guidance for the practitioner.
  

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Contents

Christian Foundations
22
Scientific Foundations
56
Psychologys Revolution
79
Integrative Psychotherapy and Domains of Intervention
114
Assessment and Case Conceptualization
145
Understanding SymptomFocused Interventions
178
Applying SymptomFocused Interventions in Treating Anxiety
217
Understanding SchemaFocused Interventions
241
Applying SchemaFocused Interventions in Treating Depression
278
Understanding RelationshipFocused Interventions
317
Applying RelationshipFocused Interventions
349
Concluding Thoughts
386
Name Index
396
Subject Index
398
Scripture Index
405
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Mark R. McMinn (Ph.D., Vanderbilt University) is a professor of psychology at George Fox University where he teaches in the Graduate Department of Clinical Psychology. He is a licensed clinical psychologist, board certified with the American Board of Professional Psychology and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. He has written several books, including Psychology, Theology, and Spirituality in Christian Counseling; Making the Best of Stress; Care for the Soul; Why Sin Matters and Finding Our Way Home.

Clark D. Campbell (Ph.D., Graduate School of Clinical Psychology, Western Seminary, Portland, Oregon) is professor and dean of the Rosemead School of Psychology at Biola University. Previously he was professor of psychology and director of clinical training at George Fox University, Graduate School of Clinical Psychology in Newberg, Oregon. He also served as adjunct associate professor of psychiatry and family medicine at the Oregon Health and Sciences University and as a clinical psychologist in private practice. Many of his articles have been published in professional psychology journals including Journal of Psychology and Theology, Journal of Psychology and Christianity, Professional Psychology: Research and Practice and The Family Psychologist.

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