Talks with T.G. Masaryk

Front Cover
Catbird Press, 1995 - Biography & Autobiography - 254 pages
6 Reviews
Never have two such important world figures collaborated in a biography: Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk (1850–1937), the original philosopher-president who founded Czechoslovakia in 1918, and Karel Capek (1890–1938), the leading Czech writer of the time. Capek interviewed Masaryk over a number of years and produced a single narrative that tells Masaryk's incredible story in a voice as ordinary yet magical as the best of Capek's fictional characters. The result is a biographical work like no other, in form or in content.
  

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Review: Talks With TG Masaryk

User Review  - Tuckova - Goodreads

Masaryk is super interesting and generally this was a good view into how he became himself. There's a lot of intellectual in-reference business that was hard for me. Read full review

Review: Talks With TG Masaryk

User Review  - Goodreads

Masaryk is super interesting and generally this was a good view into how he became himself. There's a lot of intellectual in-reference business that was hard for me. Read full review

Contents

Translators Foreword
vi
TALKS WITH
16
Youth
35
The Child and
47
A Year in the Country
54
Schooldays
68
The Wars of the Fifties
79
Vienna
85
School and Other
140
At Work and in Strife
153
The Nineties
160
Slovakia
169
to 1910
176
The PreWar Years
190
The
196
London
208

On Schools
92
At the University
104
Miss Garrigue
112
On the Threshold
118
Prague
132
1917
223
The Wars End
230
The Republic
236
Notes
250
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Karel Capek (1890?1938) is generally considered the greatest Czech author of the first half of this century. He was Czechoslovakia's leading novelist, playwright, story writer, and columnist, and the spirit of its short-lived democracy. His plays appeared on Broadway soon after their debut in Prague, and his books were translated into many languages. Capek expressed himself in the form of accessible and highly enjoyable writing.

Bibliographic information