Cyberlaw: Problems of Policy and Jurisprudence in the Information Age

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Thomson/West, 2007 - Law - 803 pages
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"This edition has been reorganized to clarify the themes of the book and updated to illuminate new debates at the heart of this evolving field. It groups the material into units addressing the who, how, and what of governance/regulation--fundamental questions that pertain to any legal system, in cyberspace or elsewhere. It includes unit-ending case studies on governance of the domain name system, efforts to control the exchange of counterfeit goods in the online marketplace, and the Google Books Settlement, as well as updated treatment of a number of topics, including peer-to-peer file sharing, online behavioral advertising, and more."--Publisher's website.

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Contents

Chapter
1
B Consumer Confusion and Online Trademarks
44
Problems of Geography and Sovereignty
63
Copyright

24 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

Paul Schiff Berman is Dean and Robert Kramer Research Professor of Law at the George Washington University Law School. Before arriving at George Washington University, he was Dean and Foundation Professor of Law at the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law at Arizona State University. He has also served as the Jesse Root Professor of Law at the University of Connecticut School of Law and as a Visiting Professor and Visiting Research Scholar at Princeton University in the Program in Law and Public Affairs. Berman has published two edited collections, authored a pioneering casebook on cyberlaw and written more than 25 scholarly articles and book chapters. He has also served on the Organizing Committee of the Association for the Study of Law, Culture and the Humanities.

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