The Beauties of the English Annuals for MDCCCXXXV. (Google eBook)

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Wallis & Newell, 1834 - English fiction - 192 pages
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Page 160 - ... a thousand spears in rest, A thousand knights are pressing close behind the snow-white crest ; And in they burst, and on they rushed, while, like a guiding star, Amidst the thickest carnage blazed the helmet of Navarre. Now, God be praised, the day is ours, Mayenne hath turned his rein. D'Aumale hath cried for quarter. The Flemish Count is slain. Their ranks are breaking like thin clouds before a Biscay gale ; The field is heap'd with bleeding steeds, and flags, and cloven mail. And then we thought...
Page 190 - And sware by him that liveth for ever and ever, who created heaven, and the things that therein are, and the earth, and the things that therein are, and the sea, and the things which are therein, that there should be time no longer...
Page 175 - Alas! my boy, thy gentle grasp is on me; The bright tears quiver in thy pleading eyes; And now fond thoughts arise, And silver cords again to earth have won me; And like a vine thou claspest my full heart How shall I hence depart ? " How the lone paths retrace where thou wert playing So late, along the mountains, at my side? And I, in joyous pride, By every place of flowers my course delaying, Wove, e'en as pearls, the lilies round thy hair, Beholding...
Page 249 - Behold !" he shouted with a voice of thunder, which stilled the roar of the crowd ; " behold how the gods protect the guiltless ! The fires of the avenging Orcus burst forth against the false witness of my accusers...
Page 156 - To sit on rocks, to muse o'er flood and fell, To slowly trace the forest's shady scene, Where things that own not man's dominion dwell, And mortal foot hath ne'er or rarely been ; To climb the trackless mountain all unseen, With the wild flock that never needs a fold ; Alone o'er steeps and foaming falls to lean ; This is not solitude ; 'tis but to hold Converse with Nature's charms, and view her stores unroll'd.
Page 255 - ... felt, the footing seemed to slide and creep, nor could chariot or litter be kept steady, even on the most level ground. Sometimes the huger stones, striking against each other as they fell, broke into countless fragments, emitting sparks of fire, which caught whatever was combustible within their reach ; and along the plains beyond the city the darkness was now terribly relieved ; for several houses, and even vineyards, had been set on flames; and at various intervals, the fires rose sullenly...
Page 167 - Yet more, the depths have more ! What wealth untold, Far down, and shining through their stillness lies ! Thou hast the starry gems, the burning gold, Won from ten thousand royal argosies ! . Sweep o'er thy spoils, thou wild and wrathful main...
Page 255 - The whole elements of civilization were broken up. Ever and anon, by the flickering lights, you saw the thief hastening by the most solemn authorities of the law, laden with, and fearfully chuckling over, the produce of his sudden gains. If, in the darkness, wife was separated from husband, or parent from child, vain was the hope of reunion. Each hurried blindly and confusedly on. Nothing in all the various and complicated machinery of social life was left, save the primal law of self-preservation...
Page 156 - Yet if, as holiest men have deem'd, there be A land of souls beyond that sable shore, To shame the doctrine of the Sadducee And sophists, madly vain of dubious lore; How sweet it were in concert to adore With those who made our mortal labours light! To hear each voice we fear'd to hear no more! Behold each mighty shade reveal'd to sight, The Bactrian...
Page 168 - YE field flowers ! the gardens eclipse you, 'tis true, Yet, wildings of Nature, I dote upon you, For ye waft me to summers of old, When the earth teemed around me with fairy delight And when daisies and buttercups gladdened my sight, Like treasures of silver and gold.

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