Singing for Freedom: The Hutchinson Family Singers and the Nineteenth-Century Culture of Reform (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Yale University Press, Oct 1, 2008 - Biography & Autobiography - 312 pages
1 Review
divdivIn the two decades prior to the Civil War, the Hutchinson Family Singers of New Hampshire became America’s most popular musical act. Out of a Baptist revival upbringing, John, Asa, Judson, and Abby Hutchinson transformed themselves in the 1840s into national icons, taking up the reform issues of their age and singing out especially for temperance and antislavery reform. This engaging book is the first to tell the full story of the Hutchinsons, how they contributed to the transformation of American culture, and how they originated the marketable American protest song.
/DIVdivThrough concerts, writings, sheet music publications, and books of lyrics, the Hutchinson Family Singers established a new space for civic action, a place at the intersection of culture, reform, religion, and politics. The book documents the Hutchinsons’ impact on abolition and other reform projects and offers an original conception of the rising importance of popular culture in antebellum America./DIV/DIV
  

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Review: Singing for Freedom: The Hutchinson Family Singers and the Nineteenth-Century Culture of Reform

User Review  - Beth - Goodreads

It took aa chapter or two to get used to the chronology, but overall this is a good resource for both the Hutchinson Family history and 19th-century US cultural history. And I enjoyed reading it--it drew me in. Read full review

Contents

PRELUDE
1
PART FIRST
19
PART SECOND
69
INTERMISSION Bridge to Part Third
104
PART THIRD
124
PART FOURTH
165
FINALE
206
Lyrics to Select Hutchinson Family Singers Songs
249
Notes
257
Index
301
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Scott Gac is visiting professor of American studies at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, and an accomplished double bass player.

Bibliographic information