The London Hanged: Crime and Civil Society in the Eighteenth Century

Front Cover
Verso, 2003 - History - 492 pages
6 Reviews
Peter Linebaugh's groundbreaking history has become an inescapable part of any understanding of the rise of capitalism. In eighteenth-century London the spectacle of a hanging served the purpose of forcing the poor population of London to accept the criminalization of customary rights and new forms of private property. In this new edition Peter Linebaugh reinforces his original arguments with detailed responses to his critics based on an impressive array of historical sources.
  

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Review: The London Hanged: Crime And Civil Society In The Eighteenth Century

User Review  - Markus Eder - Goodreads

Linebaugh´s book is a mixed blessing. He is very good at showing the social problems of the poor eighteenth century proletariat and how exploitation drove these persons into committing crime. However ... Read full review

Review: The London Hanged: Crime And Civil Society In The Eighteenth Century

User Review  - Jenn McCollum - Goodreads

This guy seriously knows how to write. The London Hanged is interesting, funny, and extremely informative. Linebaugh combines hefty research with captivating stories from the eighteenth century. He ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER Two Old Mr Gory and the Thanatocracy
42
The Sociology of
74
Industry and Idleness in the Period of Manufacture 175076
76
The Pedagogy of the Gallows under Mercantilism
113
CHAPTER FIVE Socking the Hogshead and Excise
153
Highway
184
The Waging
225
CHAPTER EIGHT Silk Makes the Difference
256
CHAPTER NINE If You Plead for Your Life Plead
288
Tire Crisis of Thanatocmcy in the Era
352
CHAPTER TPN The Delivery of Newgate 6 June 1780 333
371
The London
402
AFTERWORD TO THE SECOND EDITION
443
INDEX
483
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Peter Linebaugh is Professor of History at the University of Toledo. He writes extensively on British history, Irish history, labor history and the history of the colonial Atlantic. His books include The Magna Carta Manifesto, The Many-Headed Hydra and The London Hanged, and he contributes frequently to CounterPunch.

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