A History of England in the Eighteenth Century, Volume 5 (Google eBook)

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Appleton, 1887 - Great Britain
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Page 468 - Our political system is placed in a just correspondence and symmetry with the order of the world, and with the mode of existence decreed to a permanent body composed of transitory parts; wherein, by the disposition of a stupendous wisdom, moulding together the great mysterious incorporation of the human race...
Page 470 - We are afraid to put men to live and trade each on his own private stock of reason ; because we suspect that this stock in each man is small, and that the individuals would do better to avail themselves of the general bank and capital of nations, and of ages.
Page 482 - Nothing is a due and adequate representation of a state, that does not represent its ability, as well as its property. But as ability is a vigorous and active principle, and as property is sluggish, inert, and timid, it never can be safe from the invasions of ability, unless it be, out of all proportion, predominant in the representation.
Page 471 - The nature of man is intricate, the objects of society are of the greatest possible complexity, and therefore no simple disposition or direction of power can be suitable either to man's nature or to the quality of his affairs.
Page 471 - ... it is with infinite caution that any man ought to venture upon pulling down an edifice which has answered in any tolerable degree for ages the common purposes of society, or on building it up again, without having models and patterns of approved utility before his eyes.
Page 530 - If a great change is to be made in human affairs, the minds of men will be fitted to it ; the general opinions and feelings will draw that way. Every fear, every hope will forward it; and then they who persist in opposing this mighty current in human affairs, will appear rather to resist the decrees of Providence itself, than the mere designs of men.
Page 514 - What is government more than the management of the affairs of a nation ? It is not, and from its nature cannot be, the property of any particular man or family, but of the whole community...
Page 469 - You see, Sir, that in this enlightened age I am bold enough to confess that we are generally men of untaught feelings : that, instead of casting away all our old prejudices, we cherish them to a very considerable degree...
Page 179 - The others, the infidels, are outlaws of the constitution; not of this country, but of the human race. They are never, never to be supported, never to be tolerated. Under the systematic attacks of these people, I see some of the props of good government already begin to fail ; I see propagated principles, which will not leave to religion even a toleration. I see myself sinking every day under the attacks of these wretched people How shall I arm myself against them?
Page 462 - ... a sort of institute and digest of anarchy, called the Rights of Man, in such a pedantic abuse of elementary principles as would have disgraced boys at school...

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