The Ballads and Songs of Scotland: In View of Their Influence on the Character of the People (Google eBook)

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Macmillan and Company, 1874 - Ballads, English - 205 pages
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Page 60 - I'll wage thee! Who shall say that Fortune grieves him While the star of hope she leaves him? Me, nae cheerfu' twinkle lights me, Dark despair around benights me. I'll ne'er blame my partial fancy; Naething could resist my Nancy; But to see her was to love her, Love but her, and love for ever. Had we never loved sae kindly, Had we never loved sae blindly, Never met - or never parted, We had ne'er been broken-hearted.
Page 59 - Curst be the heart that thought the thought, And curst the hand that fired the shot, When in my arms burd Helen dropt, And died to succour me ! 0 think na ye my heart was sair, When my love dropt down and spak nae mair There did she swoon wi' meikle care, On fair Kirconnell Lee.
Page 123 - That hangs his head, and a' that ? The coward slave we pass him by, We dare be poor for a' that ! For a' that, and a' that, Our toils obscure, and a' that ; The rank is but the guinea's stamp, The man's the gowd for a
Page 150 - Ye lie, ye lie, ye liar loud ! Sae loud I hear ye lie : For Percy had not men yestreen To dight my men and me. " But I have dream'da dreary dream, Beyond the Isle of Skye ; I saw a dead man win a fight, And I think that man was I.
Page 30 - Now, ye maun go wi' me," she said ; " True Thomas, ye maun go wi' me ; And ye maun serve me seven years, Thro' weal or woe as may chance to be.
Page 30 - Ye'll ne'er get back to your ain countrie.' 0 they rade on, and farther on, And they waded through rivers aboon the knee, And they saw neither sun nor moon, But they heard the roaring of the sea. It was mirk mirk night, and there was nae stern star light, And they waded through red blude to the knee; For a' the blude, that's shed on earth, Rins through the springs o
Page 26 - Up then crew the red, red cock, And up and crew the gray; The eldest to the youngest said,
Page vii - I knew a very wise man so much of Sir Chr 's sentiment, that he believed if a man were permitted to make all the ballads, he need not care who should make the laws of a nation.
Page 54 - But thou, that didst appear so fair To fond imagination, Dost rival in the light of day Her delicate creation...
Page 107 - I am distressed for thee, my brother Jonathan: very pleasant hast thou been unto me: thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women.

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