The CIA, the British Left, and the Cold War: Calling the Tune?

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Psychology Press, 2003 - Political Science - 328 pages
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During the late 1940s the newly created CIA, in a loose alliance with anti-communist intellectuals and trade unionists, launched a massive, clandestine effort to win the Cold War allegiance of the European left. Drawing on numerous personal interviews and document collections on both sides of the Atlantic, this book examines in detail the origins of the CIA's covert campaign and assesses it's impact on the US's principal Cold War ally, Britain, focusing particularly on attempts to combat communist penetration of British trade unions, stimulate support within the Labour party for key American strategic aims, such as European union, and influence the politics of Bloomsbury literati. The results of this secret intervention were complex and far-reaching. CIA support for such ventures as the Congress for Cultural Freedom and its London-based magazine, Encounter, subtly transformed the political culture of the British left, making it more Atlanticist and less socialist. In other ways, however, the hidden hand of American intelligence failed to control its British assets, whose behaviour often frustrated their secretive patrons in Washington. For that matter, not even the CIA's agen
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Postwar Possibilities
17
The Third Force Revisited The British Left and IRD
48
CIA and NCL
82
A Case Study The New Leader and the Cultural Cold War
122
Labor Diplomacy
158
Unwitting Assets? British Intellectuals and the Congress for Cultural Freedom
193
The CIA the European Movement and Bilderberg
225
The Uses of Encounter
262
Conclusion
297
References
302
Index
317
Copyright

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