Lost Horizon

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Buccaneer Books, 1933 - Fiction - 217 pages
52 Reviews
Four people are transported to the dream-like world of Shangri-La where life is eternal and civilization refined.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AliceAnna - LibraryThing

A case of the movie and the book being highly complementary. I liked each of them in their own way. This book should be required reading to counter the artificial urgency that is the current mindset ... Read full review

Review: Lost Horizon

User Review  - Arah-Lynda - Goodreads

In 1931, four people, including Glory Conway, escape the political unrest in Baskul, China by boarding a plane, bound for Peshawar. The plane, however, much to their dismay, has been hijacked and ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
21
Section 3
37
Copyright

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About the author (1933)

James Hilton was born in Leigh, Lancashire, England on September 9, 1900. While attending the Leys School in Cambridge, he published several stories in the school magazine. In 1918, he won a scholarship to Christ's College, Cambridge, where he joined the University Officer Training Squadron. Before he saw any action, the war ended. He published his first novel, Catherine Herself, in 1920, while still an undergraduate. After Cambridge, he became a freelance journalist, writing chiefly for The Manchester Guardian and later The Irish Independent and reviewing fiction for The Daily Telegraph. During this time, he had several more of his novels published, though without conspicuous success. In 1931, he enjoyed his first popular success with And Now Goodbye and was able to take up writing fiction full time. His other works include Lost Horizon, which won the Hawthornden Prize, Goodbye Mr. Chips, and Random Harvest, all of which were made into highly successful motion pictures. In 1935, he was invited to Hollywood to work as a screenwriter. He wrote screenplays for Camille, Foreign Correspondent, Forever and a Day, The Story of Dr. Wassell, The Tuttles of Tahiti, and We Are Not Alone. He won the Best Screenplay Oscar for Mrs. Miniver in 1942. During his Hollywood years, he continued to write novels including Nothing So Strange, Morning Journey, and Time and Time Again. He also served as the narrator for Madame Curie and the adaptation of his novel So Well Remembered, in addition to hosting CBS Radio's Hallmark Playhouse from 1948 until 1953. He died of liver cancer on December 20, 1954.

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