Darwin's Luck: Chance and Fortune in the Life and Work of Charles Darwin

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A&C Black, Apr 15, 2009 - History - 195 pages
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One might make a case for saying that Darwin's life was dogged by bad luck. His mother died when he was seven; he was sent to a school at which he learnt little'; he left medical school after two years, unqualified. Two of his children died in infancy.

On the other hand one could argue that he had a privileged and fortunate life - perhaps the more common view. Patrick H. Armstrong contends that although Darwin came to the right conclusions, he did not actually follow the right path in getting there. While his science was sometimes flawed, he had the distinct knack of good instinct. Armstrong presents a fresh view of Darwin's life and methods.

  

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 Charles Darwins Origins
5
Childhood and Adolescence
11
Its Who You Know as Much as What You Know
21
5 The Offer and its Acceptance
37
6 Sailors Luck
47
Seeing Things in the Right Order
65
8 Darwins Women
87
10 The Down and Up of Family Life
109
11 The Dawning of Dangerous Ideas
121
12 The Origin of the Origin
137
13 Afterwards
155
14 Last Things
177
15 Good Luck or Bad Luck?
183
Index
191
Copyright

9 From Londons Dirt Noise Vice and Misery to an Extraordinarily Rural and Quiet Village
103

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About the author (2009)

Patrick H. Armstrong is Adjunct Associate Professor, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia.

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