The Key to My Neighbor's House: Seeking Justice in Bosnia and Rwanda

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Macmillan, Nov 17, 2001 - Political Science - 492 pages
14 Reviews
Interviewing war criminals and their victims,Neuffer explains,through the voices of people she follows over the course of a decade,how genocide erodes a nation's social and political environment.Her characters' stories and their competing notions of justice-from searching for the bodies of loved ones,to demanding war crime trials,to seeking bloody revenge-convinces readers that crimes against humanity cannot be resolved by simple talk of forgiveness,or through the more common recourse to forgetfulness.
  

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Review: The Key to My Neighbor's House: Seeking Justice in Bosnia and Rwanda

User Review  - Kelsey - Goodreads

This book takes an impressive amount of information and viewpoints to give the reader a glimpse into the the sheer chaos of two of the genocides that occurred in the 1990's. Not only does Neuffer ... Read full review

Review: The Key to My Neighbor's House: Seeking Justice in Bosnia and Rwanda

User Review  - Kari Way - Goodreads

I could not get into this book. It had a great message, though. Read full review

Contents

Blood Ties to Blood Feuds
3
The Triumph of the Underworld
32
Since Unhappily We Cannot Always Avoid Wars
59
4 The Land of 1000 Graves
83
Our Enemy Is One
107
No Safe Havens
132
Peace Without Justice
165
Searching for the Truth
190
When the Victims Are the Serbs
293
A Time of Reckoning
315
Justice Must Be Seen to Be Done
337
Justice on the Ground
351
Rwandan Crimes Arusha Justice
371
When a Tribunal Is Not Enough
389
Epilogue
403
Notes
411

Bring Me His Body
215
Having Clean Hands
248
What a Tutsi Woman Tastes Like
271

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About the author (2001)

Elizabeth Neuffer is an award-winning reporter for The Boston Globe. While serving as the paper's European Bureau Chief, she won the the Courage In Journalism Award and was then named an Edward R. Murrow Fellow of the Council on Foreign Relations. She lives in New York City.

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