A clinical study of diseases of the kidneys (Google eBook)

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W. T. Keener, 1889 - Kidneys - 431 pages
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Page 135 - If the patient is very thirsty he may drink Clysmic, Bethesda, Poland, or Vichy water. If he have a strong desire for solid food at the end of the second or third week, he may have a little stale white bread or toasted bread with salt, in the morning and again at 4 PM Once a day he may have some soup made of milk and oatmeal. After continuing this treatment for five or six weeks it may be modified, by allowing the milk only thrice daily, and once a day steak or a chop.
Page 433 - An experimental contribution to Intestinal Surgery, with special reference to the Treatment of Intestinal Obstruction.
Page 23 - caunot be regarded as a mere aggregation of private interests ; it is eminently national. It would seem, therefore, to be a matter of public policy that inquiry should be made, from time to time, in order to ascertain whether the purposes of its existence are fulfilled ; and that such measures should be taken as may serve to raise its efficiency to the highest point, and to diffuse its benefits most widely.
Page 335 - Whenever the bladder becomes sufficiently distended to produce pain and the ordinary remedies fail to give relief, recourse is to be had to the catheter. Before employing a soft catheter it must be soaked for ten minutes in hot soap-water and flushed out with it ; then it is disinfected with a strong germicide lotion, preferably corrosive sublimate, from which it must be freed again by another flushing with salt water before it is anointed with iodoformized vaseline for introduction. (The salt water...
Page 433 - After completing his book, the surgeon lays it down with the conviction that at last the difficulties and dangers of abdominal work have been overcome, that the definite rules of operative procedure are established, that this branch of surgical knowledge is completed from Alpha to Omega. In the toil and travail of an obscure case there may be a tendency in the mind of the operator to resent this "cock-sure...
Page 435 - York Medical Journal Those who would like to acquaint themselves with what science has to say on these topics and learn how they are regarded by the wisest, students of this age, may turn with profit to the pages of this book. The author is well known, not only as a skilled physician and accomplished teacher, but as one of the most polished writers of the American Medical Press. Philadelphia Medical and Surgical Reporter.
Page 334 - Female, was read by Dr. Augustus P. Clark, of Cambridge, Mass. The symptoms present in a case of cystitis are often but an expression of the organ that there has occurred a lesion or a morbid process at a distance from the part seemingly affected. Anal and rectal inflammation are not uncommon causes of inflammation of the bladder. Dilatation of the urethra is indicated in those cases where tenesmus is an important symptom, and in which the parts around have been hypertrophied and contracted. Faradism,...
Page 433 - Castro-intestinal canal will probably not be found to sustain this claim, yet no one can deny the immense value of this method, nor withhold admiration for the genius which prompted its application. Finally, his book should be read to be duly appreciated, and no higher tribute can be paid to its value than that it stimulates the surgeon to better thought and better work. WT KEENER, Medical Publisher, Importer and Bookseller, 96 Washington Street, CHICAGO.
Page 369 - ... which may be bottled and set aside for use. As usually made, it generally throws down a slight, reddish deposit upon standing a week or two. This, however, does not affect its value as a test ; in using, simply decant the clear liquid from the sediment.
Page 381 - When the urine comes in contact with the hot alkaline solution, a ring of phosphates is formed, and after a few minutes, if acetone or its allies are present, the ring will become yellow and studded with yellow points of iodoform. These, in time, will sink through the ring of phosphates and be deposited at the bottom of the tube.

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