Law and Government in Medieval England and Normandy: Essays in Honour of Sir James Holt

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 28, 1994 - History - 387 pages
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The works of Sir James Holt are well known to all those working in medieval history, in Europe, North America and Japan. This important set of essays, written in his honour, reflects his interests which have set a new agenda for the study of medieval law and government. The first group, on rebellion and warfare, brings to mind his work on the Northerners; the second analyses the issues of land-holding, family and politics; which he discussed in a series of papers from the early 1970s. The third group treats documents, politics and government, a field which Holt made his own, and in which his collection of Henry II and Richard I's Acts is of outstanding importance. The essays have been contributed by specialists who have worked with, studied under, or debated with the honorand.
  

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Contents

Military intelligence under the Norman
1
aspects of warfare
56
Ducal succession in early Normandy
80
Quadripartitus 11 1
111
AngloNorman land law and the origins of property
198
The origin of prerogative wardship
223
Possessioproprietas in ecclesiastical courts in mid
245
The sheriffs of Henry II and the signif1cance of 1170
255
The charters of the Empress Matilda
276
A Norman conventio and bonds of lordship in
299
The archbishopric of York and the extent of
325
Archdeacons and parish churches in England
341
A bibliography of published writings of Sir James Holt
365
Index of names and places
372
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About the author (1994)

A freelance writer and journalist and author of several books for Sutton on regional Christmases.

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