Islands in the Stream

Front Cover
Harper Collins, May 8, 2012 - Fiction - 475 pages
20 Reviews

Islands in the Stream tells the story of Thomas Hudson as he moves through different stages of his life. The first posthumously published book by Ernest Hemingway, Islands in the Stream was intended to revive the author’s reputation following negative reviews of Across the River and into the Trees. It was discovered by Hemingway’s widow, Mary, among 332 different works left unfinished at his death and, as with Hemingway’s previous works, draws heavily on his personal relationships and experiences during the Second World War.

HarperPerennial Classics brings great works of literature to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperPerennial Classics collection to build your digital library.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
7
3 stars
6
2 stars
0
1 star
2

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AliceAnna - LibraryThing

Excellent wonderful heartbreaking story. I'd forgotten what a wonderful writer EH could be. The cover of the paperback I have is ridiculous, making it look as those this book is a maudlin love story ... Read full review

Review: Islands in the Stream

User Review  - Tanvir Ahmed - Goodreads

Of the Hemingway books I've read or tried to read, Islands in the Stream is my favorite thus far. All the great and not-so-great elements of his legendary style are here, from the deadpan prose to the ... Read full review

Contents

I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII

IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
XIV
XV
Part II Cuba
Part III At Sea
I
II
III
IV
XIII
XIV
XV
XVI
XVII
XVIII
XIX
XX
XXI
About the Author
About the Series
Copyright
About the Publisher

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

Ernest Hemingway was one of America’s foremost journalists and authors. A winner of both the Pulitzer Prize (1953) and the Nobel Prize for Literature (1954), Hemingway is widely credited with driving a fundamental shift in prose writing in the early twentieth century. As an American expatriate in Paris in the 1920s, Ernest Hemingway achieved international fame with such literary works as The Sun Also Rises, The Old Man and the Sea, and For Whom the Bell Tolls, which depicts his experience as a correspondent during the Spanish Civil War. Hemingway died in 1961, leaving behind a rich literary legacy.

Bibliographic information