Child abuse: implications for child development and psychopathology

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Sage Publications, Jun 29, 1999 - Family & Relationships - 140 pages
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"Everyone knows that child abuse is morally wrong. David A. Wolfe goes beyond this to explore how and why it affects the development of children. This is the story professionals need to know to plan their helping strategy." --James Garbarino, Ph.D.Co-Director, Family Life Development Center, Cornell University

Child Abuse, Second Edition is devoted to a topic of major social and clinical significance. In this book, the author describes the different types of abuse and discusses the influence they have on development, including the emotional, cognitive, academic, and social consequences in childhood and adolescents. The book uses theory and research to convey the importance of multiple contextual influences that affect abuse and can be used to ameliorate it.

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Contents

Normal and Abnormal ChildRearing Patterns
18
A Developmental Perspective of the Abused Child
35
Theory and Background
57
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

David A. Wolfe, PhD, holds the RBC Chair in Children's Mental Health at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and is a Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Toronto. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and past president of Division 37 (Child, Youth, and Family Services). Dr. Wolfe has broad research and clinical interests in abnormal child and adolescent psychology, with a special focus on child abuse, domestic violence, and developmental psychopathology, and he has published widely on these topics. Dr. Wolfe is the 2005 recipient of the Donald O. Hebb award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology from the Canadian Psychological Association.
Eric J. Mash, PhD, is Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychology and Program in Clinical Psychology at the University of Calgary. He is a fellow of the American and Canadian Psychological Associations; has served as an editor, editorial board member, and editorial consultant for many scientific and professional journals; and has written or edited numerous books and journal articles on children's mental health, child and adolescent psychopathology, child and adolescent psychotherapy, and child and family assessment. Dr. Mash's research has focused on family relationships across a variety of child and family disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), conduct problems, internalizing disorders, and maltreatment.