Handbook of children and the media

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Sage Publications, 2001 - Psychology - 765 pages
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"An impressive work that could easily become the classic textbook on the effects of media on children." - VOYA "A readable handbook that is certain to be an important resource for students, scholars, and researchers in a variety of disciplines." - CHOICE From Internet censorship to levels of television exposure, the effects of mass media on children is one of the most widely debated issues in our society. Bringing together an interdisciplinary group of renowned scholars from around the world, the Handbook of Children and the Media is the first and only all-inclusive, comprehensive analysis of the field for students and scholars. This book summarizes the current scope of research on children and the media, suggests directions for future research, and attempts to provide students with a deliberate examination of how children use, enjoy, learn from, and are advantaged or disadvantaged by regular exposure to television and other electronic media. Features of this volume: Authoritative. The respected experience of Dorothy and Jerome Singer, coupled with an outstanding team of contributing authors, makes this the most authoritative volume available on this topic. Comprehensive. 39 chapters in 3 sections examine the psychological, health, and social effects of media on children and their development, the media industry and environment, and policy issues and advocacy. Inclusive. In addition to the "traditional" media of television, film, and advertising, "new media" such as the Internet and video games are also examined. A welcomed research base. Debates surrounding important policy decisions in this area are often largely uninformed by empirical evidence. This text reviews diverse research and is a touchstone work in this area for policymakers, as well as scholars and students throughout communication studies and the social and behavioral sciences. The Handbook of Children and the Media is an outstanding text for classes and will provide students in communication, psychology, family studies, education, sociology, public policy, and related fields with a valuable reference work as they continue their studies in this important area. Beyond the classroom setting, policymakers, media professionals, and concerned parents will all find much to value in this landmark volume.

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Contents

The History of Childrens Use of Electronic Media
7
Implications for Child Development
29
The Use of Television and Other FilmRelated Media
47
Copyright

37 other sections not shown

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About the author (2001)

Dorothy G. Singer, is retired Senior Research Scientist, Department of Psychology, Yale University. Dr. Singer is also Co-Director, with Jerome L. Singer, of the Yale University Family Television Research and Consultation Center affiliated with the Zigler Center for Child Development and Public Policy. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. Her research and publications are in the area of early childhood development, television effects on youth, and parent training in imaginative play. She received the Distinguished Alumni Award from Teachers College, Columbia University in 2006, and in 2009, the Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to Media Psychology from the American Psychological Association.

Jerome L. Singer is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Yale University and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. His specialty is research on the psychology of imagination and daydreaming. Dr. Singer has authored articles on thought processes, imagery, personality, psychotherapy, children's play, and the effects of television. He has been President of the Division of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts in the American Psychological Association. In 2008, he was awarded the Rudolf Arnheim Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts from the American Psychological Association, and in 2009, the Paul Farnsworth Award for Lifetime Contribution and Service, Division 10, American Psychological Association.