Climbing up to glory: a short history of African Americans during the Civil War and Reconstruction

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SR Books, 2002 - History - 285 pages
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The Civil War was undeniably an integral event in American history, but for African Americans, whose personal liberties were dependent upon its outcome, it was an especially critical juncture. In Climbing Up to Glory, Wilbert L. Jenkins explores this defining period in a story that documents the journey of average African Americans as they struggled to reinvent their lives following the abolition of slavery. In this highly readable book, Jenkins examines the unflagging determination and inner strength of African Americans as they sought to construct a solid economic base for themselves and their families by establishing their own businesses and banks and strove to own their own land. He portrays the racial violence and other obstacles blacks endured as they pooled meager resources to institute and maintain their own schools and attempted to participate in the political process. Compelling and informative, Climbing Up to Glory is an unforgettable tribute to a glowing period in African-American history sure to enrich and inspire American and African-American history enthusiasts.

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Contents

CHAPTER
1
CHAPTER
25
chapter three
79
Copyright

8 other sections not shown

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About the author (2002)

Jenkins is an Associate Professor of History at Temple University in Philadelphia.