The History of Birmingham (Google eBook)

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Wrightson and Webb, 1836 - Birmingham (England) - 259 pages
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Page 126 - God is our guide, from field, from wave, From plough, from anvil, and from loom, We come, our country's rights to save, And speak a tyrant faction's doom : And hark ! we raise, from sea to sea, The sacred watchword—Liberty.
Page 136 - That your petitioners find it declared, in the Bill of Rights, that the people of England " may have arms for their defence, suitable to their condition, and as allowed by law
Page 137 - the representation of the people, by which they are convinced, that the prerogatives of the crown, the authority of both houses of parliament, and the rights and liberties of the people are
Page 118 - for the accomplishment of a constitutional reform in the commons' house of parliament, will, I trust, be regulated by a due sense of the necessity of order and moderation in their proceedings. To the consideration of this important question, the attention of parliament must necessarily be
Page 127 - sword we draw ; We kindle not war's battle fires ; By union, justice, reason, law, We claim the birthright of our sires ; We raise the watchword—Liberty, We will, we will, we will be free.
Page 126 - Lo ! we answer, see, we come, Quick at freedom's holy call, We come, we come, we come, we come, To do the glorious work of all : And hark ! we raise, from sea to sea, The sacred
Page 137 - such persons only as will carry into effect, unimpaired in all its essential provisions, that bill for the reform of the representation of the people, which has recently passed this house.
Page 20 - of the parish stands Aston furnace, appropriated for melting iron-stone, and reducing it into pigs ; this has the appearance of great antiquity. From the melted ore, in this subterranean region of infernal aspect, is produced a calx or cinder, of which there is an enormous mountain.
Page 137 - attachment to his majesty's person and throne, humbly, but most earnestly to implore his majesty, to call to his counsels such persons only as will carry into effect, unimpaired in all its essential provisions, that bill for the reform of the representation of the people, which has recently passed this house.
Page 190 - In private life he was a humourist; idle in the extreme; but his invention was of the true Birmingham model, active. He could well design, but procured others to execute; wherever he found merit, he caressed it. He was remarkably polite to the stranger, fond of shew ; a figure rather of the smaller size, and delighted to adorn that figure with gold lace.

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