The Works of Jonathan Swift: Containing Additional Letters, Tracts, and Poems Not Hitherto Published; with Notes and a Life of the Author, Volume 17 (Google eBook)

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A. Constable, 1814
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Page 44 - Our friend Gay is used as the friends of Tories are by Whigs and generally by Tories too. Because he had humour, he was supposed to have dealt with Dr. Swift, in like manner as when any one had learning formerly, he was thought to have dealt with the devil...
Page 188 - If we have sown unto you spiritual things, is it a great thing if we shall reap your carnal things?
Page 40 - Upon this great foundation of misanthropy (though not in Timon's manner) the whole building of my travels is erected ; and I never will have peace of mind till all honest men are of my opinion...
Page 276 - Pray, my lord, how are the gardens ? have you taken down the mount, and removed the yew hedges ? Have you not bad weather for the spring corn ? Has Mr. Pope gone farther in his Ethic Poems ?* and is the head-land sown with wheat ? and what says Polybius ? and how does my Lord St.
Page 191 - Have you dedicated your opera, and got the usual dedication fee of twenty guineas ? How is the doctor ? does he not chide that you never called upon him for hints ? Is my Lord Bolingbroke, at the moment I am writing, a planter, a philosopher, or a writer ? Is Mr. Pulteney in...
Page 225 - ... admiration of what you say, but for fear of a shower. He is pleased with your placing him...
Page 291 - Some comedy, a great deal of tragedy, and the whole interspersed with scenes of Harlequin, Scaramouch, and Dr Baloardo, the prototype of your hero Oxford.
Page 39 - I have employed my time (besides ditching) in finishing, correcting, amending, and transcribing my ' Travels ' [Gulliver's], in four parts complete, newly augmented, and intended for the press when the world shall deserve them, or rather, when a printer shall be found brave enough to venture his ears.
Page 226 - Dunciad ' is going to be printed in all pomp, with the inscription, which makes me proudest. It will be attended with proeme, prolegomena, testimonia scriptorum, index authorum, and notes variorum. As to the latter, I desire you to read over the text, and make a few in any way you like best ; whether dry raillery, upon the style and way of commenting of trivial critics ; or humorous, upon the authors in the poem ; or historical, of persons, places, times ; or explanatory, or collecting the parallel...
Page 276 - It is time for me to have done with the world, and so I would if I could get into a better before I was called into the best, and not die here in a rage, like a poisoned rat in a hole.

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