On the preparation of printing ink; both black and coloured (Google eBook)

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1832
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Page 60 - best, and is accordingly preferred for the black ink, though the darker colour which it acquires from the fire makes it less fit for the red. It is said that the other expressed oils cannot be sufficiently freed from their unctuous quality ; whence the ink made with them dries
Page 61 - The oil is suffered to burn for half an hour or more, and the flame being then extinguished by covering the vessel close, the boiling is afterwards continued, with a gentle heat, till the oil appears of a proper consistence, in which
Page 86 - is the common material to give the black colour, of which two ounces and a half are sufficient for sixteen ounces of the varnish. Vermilion is a good red. They are ground together on a stone with a muller, in the same manner as oil paints.
Page 84 - continued with a gentle heat, till the oil appears of a proper consistence: in which state it is called varnish. It is necessary to have two kinds of this varnish, a thicker, and a thinner, from the greater or
Page 60 - capable of holding at least half as much more; for the oil swells up greatly, and its boiling over into the fire would be very dangerous. When it boils, it is kept stirring with an
Page 85 - dissolves it; but it readily enough mingles with fresh oil, and unites with mucilages into a mass diffusible in water in an emulsive form. Boiling with caustic alkali produces a soapy compound. It is by washing with hot soap-lees and a brush that the printers clean their types. The oil loses from
Page 64 - two ounces and a half are sufficient for sixteen ounces of the varnish. They are ground together on a stone with a muller, in the same manner as oil paints. " The paper, for printing, is moistened with water,
Page 106 - is completely liquid at 306, and at about 316 bubbles of gaseous matter escape, giving rise to the appearance of ebullition. By distillation it yields empyreumatic oils: in the first part of the process a limpid oil passes over, which rises
Page 5 - Britannica is the only work to my knowledge which has broken through the trammels of obsolete authorities, and given a receipt by which a Printing Ink might be made that could be used; but the editor candidly acknowledges that the article produced would be of an inferior
Page 63 - paper, by the spreading or coming off of the ink, cannot be avoided ; that it is much more eligible to use old oil than to have recourse to this correction of the new, both turpentine and litharge, particularly the last, making the mixture adhere so firmly to the types, that it is

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