Irish film: the emergence of a contemporary cinema

Front Cover
British Film Institute, 2000 - Performing Arts - 234 pages
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Oscars for Daniel Day Lewis and Brenda Fricker for their roles in My Left Foot (1989) and Neil Jordan's original screenplay Oscar for The Crying Game (1992) are the tip of a large iceberg including other films such as Michael Collins (1996), and The General (1998) that have confirmed the growing reputation of Irish cinema. This energetic film activity has inevitably generated a considerable critical debate in Ireland and outside about the kinds of films that are made and the representation of Ireland and the Irish they promote. This book explores the dominant images of the Irish found in the cinemas of the United States and Britain and considers the ways in which recent Irish-made films might be said to offer a response to them.
The bulk of the book offers detailed readings of a wide range of key films including The Butcher Boy (1998), Patriot Games (1993), and Angela's Ashes (2000). It discusses the full range of Irish cinematic production from the low budget work of indigenous filmmakers like Comerford and Breathnach, to the bigger Hollywood productions like Ron Howard's Far and Away (1992), and the "second" cinema of a number of directors such as Neil Jordan and Jim Sheridan where medium-sized budgets allow for greater creative control in Ireland.
Feeding into wider debates about national and cultural identity, postnational cinema, and the role of the state, this book provides a unique overview of how a relatively small film culture such as Ireland's can live successfully in the shadow of Hollywood. Oscars for Daniel Day Lewis and Brenda Fricker for their roles in My Left Foot (1989) and Neil Jordan's original screenplay Oscar for The Crying Game (1992) are the tip of a large iceberg including other films such as Michael Collins (1996), and The General (1998) that have confirmed the growing reputation of Irish cinema. This energetic film activity has inevitably generated a considerable critical debate in Ireland and outside about the kinds of films that are made and the representation of Ireland and the Irish they promote. This book explores the dominant images of the Irish found in the cinemas of the United States and Britain and considers the ways in which recent Irish-made films might be said to offer a response to them.
The bulk of the book offers detailed readings of a wide range of key films including The Butcher Boy (1998), Patriot Games (1993), and Angela's Ashes (2000). It discusses the full range of Irish cinematic production from the low budget work of indigenous filmmakers like Comerford and Breathnach, to the bigger Hollywood productions like Ron Howard's Far and Away (1992), and the "second" cinema of a number of directors such as Neil Jordan and Jim Sheridan where medium-sized budgets allow for greater creative control in Ireland.
Feeding into wider debates about national and cultural identity, postnational cinema, and the role of the state, this book provides a unique overview of how a relatively small film culture such as Ireland's can live successfully in the shadow of Hollywood.

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Contents

Nationalism Popular Culture and the Cinema in Ireland
9
Traditions of Representation Romanticism and Landscape
33
Traditions of Representation Political Violence and
60
Copyright

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References to this book

The Butcher Boy
Colin MacCabe
Limited preview - 2007
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About the author (2000)

Martin McLoone is Senior Lecturer in Media Studies at the University of Ulster, Coleraine.

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