Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control

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Macmillan, Feb 15, 1997 - Psychology - 604 pages
4 Reviews
Ideal for advanced undergraduate or graduate courses, or for professional use, the book is based on Bandura's theory that those with high self-efficacy expectancies - the belief that one can achieve what one sets out to do - are healthier, more effective, and generally more successful than those with low self-efficacy expectancies. He begins with a discussion of theory and method: what self-efficacy is and how it can be developed. Bandura then demonstrates how belief in one's capabilities affects development and psychosocial functioning during the course of life, underscoring provocative applications of this work to issues in education, health, psychopathology, athletics, business, and international affairs.
  

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User Review  - EstherReader - LibraryThing

Bandura sets out his highly influential theory of human motivation in this weighty tome. I'm working on this for my PhD thesis and I think this book is a must-have for anyone needing to understand ... Read full review

Review: Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control

User Review  - Anthony Francavilla - Goodreads

Exceptional book that really isolates why some people hold themselves back while others achieve. Bandura comes off as unbelievably intelligent and even some of the throw away sentences are tremendously insightful. Read full review

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Contents

Chapter
13
The Nature and Structure
36
Mediating Processes
116
Developmental Analysis
162
Chapter 6
204
Cognitive Functioning
212
Health Functioning
259
Chapter 8
319
Chapter 9
368
Organizational Functioning
422
Chapter 11
469
Collective Efficacy
477
References
526
Name Index
575
Subject Index
591
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About the author (1997)

Albert Bandura was born on December 4, 1925, in Mundare, Alberta, Canada. He attended school at an elementary and high school in one and received his bachelor's from the University of British Columbia in 1949. Before he entered college, he spent one summer filling holes on the Alaska Highway in the Yukon. Bandura graduated from the University of Iowa in 1952 with his Ph. D., and after graduating, took a post-doctoral position with the Wichita Guidance Center in Kansas. In 1953, Bandura accepted a position teaching at Stanford University. There he collaborated with student, Richard Walters on his first book, "Adolescent Aggression" in 1959. He was President of the APA in 1973 and received the APA's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contribution in 1980. In 1999 he received the Thorndike Award for Distinguished Contributions of Psychology to Education from the American Psychological Association, and in 2001, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy. He is also the recipient of the Outstanding Lifetime Contribution to Psychology Award from the American Psychological Association and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Western Psychological Association, the James McKeen Cattell Award from the American Psychological Society, and the Gold Medal Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contribution to Psychological Science from the American Psychological Foundation. In 2008, he received the Grawemeyer Award for contributions to psychology. His works include Social Learning Theory, Social Foundations of Thought and Action: A Social Cognitive Theory, and Self-efficacy : the exercise of control.

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