Takedown: The Fall of the Last Mafia Empire

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G.P. Putnam's, 2002 - Social Science - 363 pages
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Seldom has the netherworld of the mafia been revealed with such fascinating detail and sheer suspense. Like the classics of the genre-from The Godfather to The French Connection to Wise Guy-Takedown leads us to the inner ring of a conspiracy of corruption and terror that held the city in its grip for nearly fifty years.

Rick Cowan was a young NYPD detective in 1992 when he dropped by a Brooklyn waterfront warehouse to investigate a recent fire bombing-only one in a string of interviews he considered routine. But what he found there was far from routine, for it would take him on a five-year odyssey and nearly cost him his life. In fact, he had stumbled upon the lead of a lifetime-the suspicion that he might unearth the hard evidence police and federal agencies alike had been chasing for decades: the proof of collusion among the mob families to extort billions from the nation's most influential corporations that call New York their home.

Featuring eccentric, larger-than-life New York characters and an undercover cop on the brink of being discovered-and murdered-at every step, Takedown is a riveting real-life procedural and one of the most important investigative books of the season.

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Takedown: the fall of the last Mafia empire

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In 1992, New York City detective Cowan was investigating a truck bombing at a Brooklyn garbage transfer station when the"mobbed-up" thugs responsible for the crime showed up to further intimidate Sal ... Read full review

Contents

Plymouth Street
1
THE CANDY STORE
11
SINISTER SHADOWS
21
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (2002)

Rick Cowan is a twenty-year veteran of the New York Police Department, where he remains on active duty as Detective First-Grade. His undercover role in Operation Wasteland earned him a personal promotion from then Police Commissioner William Bratton.

Douglas Century is a contributing writer for The New York Times whose work has appeared in numerous other national publications.

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