The Rivals of Aristophanes: Studies in Athenian Old Comedy

Front Cover
Duckworth and the Classical Press of Wales, 2000 - Poetry - 556 pages
0 Reviews
Due to the scarcity of surviving texts by other poets, it is easy to forget that Aristophanes wrote for competition and that rivalry was an important component in the rhetoric of his comedies, especially Clouds and Knights . This important study, comprising 26 essays by leading international scholars presented at a conference held at the Institute of Classical Studies in London in 1996, aims to promote a better understanding of Aristophanes' work by assessing that of his many rivals, including Cratinus, Hermippus and Eupolis, who regularly triumphed over Aristophanes at major civic festivals. The papers also consider the evidence for Aristophanes' rival poets in other sources, notably painted vases. The chapters are divided into five sections: editing comic fragments, poets of Old Comedy, the transition to Middle Comedy, literary themes and social themes. Contributors: Kenneth Dover, W Geoffrey Arnott, Wolfgang Luppe, Ralph M Rosen, James Davidson, S Douglas Olson, Dwora Gilula, David Harvey, Jeffrey Henderson, David Braund, Giorgos Kavvadias, Ian C Storey, Thomas Braun, Heinz-Guenther Nesselrath, Keith Sidwell, N J Lowe, Bernhard Zimmermann, Stephen Colvin, Michael Silk, Angus Bowie, John Wilkins, Nick Fisher, Andrew Dalby, Edith Hall, Christopher Carey, Alan H Sommerstein, Paola Ceccarelli, Ian Ruffell.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

On editing fragments from literary and lexicographic sources
1
The rivalry between Aristophanes and Kratinos
15
Cratinus Pytine and the construction of the comic self
23
Copyright

27 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2000)

David Harvey is one of the world's leading critical intellectuals. He is the author of 10 books, many of which are classics. He now teaches at the CUNY Graduate Center and the London School of Economics, after many years teaching at Johns Hopkins and Oxford.

John Wilkins is Reader in Greek Literature at the University of Exeter and has written or edited several books on food in antiquity. He is currently producing an edition of Galen's De alimentorum facultatibus for the Bude series of classical texts.

Bibliographic information