The History of Forgetting: Los Angeles and the Erasure of Memory

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Verso, 1997 - Social Science - 330 pages
4 Reviews
Los Angeles is a city which has long thrived on the continual re-creation of own myth. In this highly original work, Norman Klein examines the process of memory erasure in the city. Using a distinctive mixture of fact and fiction, Klein takes us on an “anti-tour” of downtown LA. He investigates the life for Vietnamese immigrants in the City of Dreams, playfully imagines Walter Benjamin as a Los Angeleno, and looks at the way information technology has recreated the city, turning cyberspace into the last suburb. We observe the close up demolition of neighbourhoods by urban planners, TV’s misrepresentation of the Rodney King uprising in1992, the effect on public consciousness of earthquakes, fires and racial panic, and the way in which crime novels make LA slums seem like abandoned cities in the Central American jungle.
  

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Review: The History of Forgetting: Los Angeles and the Erasure of Memory (Haymarket)

User Review  - Maxwell Harwitt - Goodreads

"Why do research when I can just write a whole book of history and earn a teaching position from conjectures based on the little I currently know about the subject?" Read full review

Review: The History of Forgetting: Los Angeles and the Erasure of Memory (Haymarket)

User Review  - Malcolm - Goodreads

LA is one of those cities we all like to think we know, after all we see it in our mass and popular cultural texts, hear it in the news, read it all over - its sheer ubiquity makes it a know. Norman ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
A Noir and Forgetting
73
Building Blade Runner
94
Movie Locations
103
Imagined Fears after April 1992
114
Two Neighborhoods
123
PART II
147
DOCUFABLES
217
Fictions
226
PART IV
245
TWELVE
295
Borges Father
318
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Norman M. Klein is a critic and historian of mass culture, editor of Fragile Moments: A History of Media-Induced Experience, and author of Seven Minutes: The Life and Death of the American Animated Cartoon from Verso. He teaches at the California Institute of the Arts in Los Angeles.

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