The first book of American history

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F. Watts, Jan 1, 1957 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 62 pages
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Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
6
Section 3
59
Copyright

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About the author (1957)

A native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who was educated at the University of Chicago, Henry Steele Commager taught history first at New York University and then at Columbia University. Upon his retirement from Columbia in 1956, he moved on to Amherst College. In addition to lecturing at many universities throughout the world, he has been Harmsworth Professor at Oxford University and Pitt Professor at Cambridge University, where he is also an honorary fellow at Peterhouse College. Commager's writings range widely over such topics as education, the Civil War, civil liberties, the Enlightenment, and immigration. Many of his books reflect his keen interest in constitutional history and civil liberties. Commager is also a documentarian, who is said to consider Documents of American History (1934), the 1988 edition of which he coedited with Milton Cantor, to be his most significant contribution.

Leonard Everett Fisher is a well-known and prolific author and illustrator of children's books. He has also written for adults and created illustrations for magazines. In addition, Fisher was dean of the Whitney School of Art and a visiting professor at a number of schools. Fisher was born in 1927 in the Bronx, New York, and started to draw as a small child. After graduating from high school, he studied at Brooklyn College and then entered the army where he worked with a mapmaker. He holds a B.F.A. and a M.F.A. from Yale University. The first book that Fisher illustrated was The Exploits of Xenophon, written by Geoffrey Household and published in 1955. Fisher then illustrated and wrote numerous books himself. He is well known for the Colonial Americans series, for the Nineteenth-Century America series for young adults, and for many other nonfiction works. He has written two works for adults-Masterpieces of American Painting (1985) and Remington and Russell (1986).

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