Theology in the English Poets: Cowper, Coleridge, Wordsworth and Burns (Google eBook)

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Henry S. King, 1874 - English poetry - 339 pages
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Page 126 - I have seen A curious child, who dwelt upon a tract Of inland ground, applying to his ear The convolutions of a smooth-lipped shell ; To which, in silence hushed, his very soul Listened intensely ; and his countenance soon Brightened with joy ; for murmurings from within Were heard, sonorous cadences ! whereby, To his belief, the monitor expressed Mysterious union with its native sea. Even such a shell the universe itself Is to the ear of Faith...
Page 121 - How exquisitely the individual Mind (And the progressive powers perhaps no less Of the whole species) to the external World Is fitted : and how exquisitely, too Theme this but little heard of among men The external World is fitted to the Mind; And the creation (by no lower name Can it be called) which they with blended might Accomplish : this is our high argument.
Page 76 - ... my path was rough, This joy within me dallied with distress, And all misfortunes were but as the stuff Whence Fancy made me dreams of happiness: For hope grew round me, like the twining vine, 80 And fruits, and foliage, not my own, seemed mine.
Page 129 - Sea that bares her bosom to the moon; The winds that will be howling at all hours, And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers; For this, for everything, we are out of tune; It moves us not.
Page 84 - Thy habitation from eternity ! 0 dread and silent mount ! I gazed upon thee, Till thou, still present to the bodily sense, Didst vanish from my thought: entranced in prayer, 1 worshipped the Invisible alone. Yet, like some sweet beguiling melody, So sweet, we know not we are listening to it...
Page 89 - The upper air burst into life ! And a hundred fire-flags sheen, To and fro they were hurried about ! And to and fro, and in and out, The wan stars danced between. And the coming wind did roar more loud, And the sails did sigh like sedge ; And the rain poured down from one black cloud ; The Moon was at its edge.
Page 311 - The best laid schemes o' mice an' men Gang aft a-gley, An' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain For promis'd joy. Still thou art blest compared wi' me ! The present only toucheth thee : But, och ! I backward cast my e'e On prospects drear, An' forward, tho' I canna see, I guess an
Page 15 - STEVENSON (Rev. WF). Hymns for the Church and Home. Selected and Edited by the Rev. W. Fleming Stevenson. The most complete Hymn Book published. The Hymn Book consists of Three Parts : I.
Page 88 - The moving Moon went up the sky, And no where did abide: Softly she was going up, And a star or two beside Her beams bemocked the sultry main, Like April hoar-frost spread; But where the ship's huge shadow lay, The charmed water burnt alway A still and awful red.
Page 65 - Yet, oh, the thought that thou art safe, and he ! That thought is joy, arrive what may to me. My boast is not, that I deduce my birth From loins enthroned and rulers of the earth ; But higher far my proud pretensions rise The son of parents passed into the skies ! And now, farewell Time unrevoked has run His wonted course, yet what I wished is done.

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