Obed Hussey, Who, of All Inventors, Made Bread Cheap: Being a True Record of His Life and Struggles to Introduce His Greatest Invention, the Reaper, and Its Success, as Gathered from Pamphlets Published Heretofore by Some of His Friends and Associates, and Reprinted in this Volume, Together with Some Additional Facts and Testimonials from Other Sources (Google eBook)

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Follett Lamberton Greeno
Rochester Herald Publishing Company, 1912 - Harvesting machinery - 228 pages
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Page 96 - My father was a farmer in the county of Rockbridge, State of Virginia, United States. He made an experiment in cutting grain, in the year 1816, by a number of cylinders standing perpendicularly. Another experiment of the same kind was made by my father in the harvest of 1831, which satisfied my father to abandon it. Thereupon my attention was directed to the subject, and the same harvest I invented and put in operation, in cutting late oats on the farm of John Steele, adjoining my father's, those...
Page 222 - ... the state of the weather. "There have been many other trials of Hussey's machine in different parts of the country, and the result has been so far uniformly satisfactory. Amongst these we have now to mention a very interesting one which took place by appointment last Saturday, at Windsor, in the presence of his Royal Highness, Prince Albert, originating in a correspondence between General Wemyss, on behalf of the Prince, and Messrs. Dray & Co. of Swan-lane, the agents for Mr. Hussey. The...
Page 81 - ... country, where the growth of corn is forced by the application of dung. Our farmers may well, therefore, have been astonished by an American implement which not only reaped their wheat but performed the work with the neatness and certainty of an old and perfect machine. Its novelty of action...
Page 204 - The jury regret exceedingly the most unfavourable state of the weather on the days of trial (a perfect hurricane raging the whole of the first day), and their consequent inability to make so full and satisfactory a trial as they could have wished. The machines were tested on a crop of wheat, computed at 25 bushels per acre, very much laid ; and on barley at 25 bushels per acre, very short in the straw, and if possible more laid than the wheat. The jury, taking the different points submitted to their...
Page 142 - I was often advised by my father and family to abandon it and pursue my regular business, as likely to be more profitable, he having given me a farm. No machines were sold until 1840, and I may say that they were not of much practical value until the improvements of my second patent, 1845. " These improvements consist in reversing the angle of the...
Page 99 - ... pursue my regular business, as likely to be more profitable, he having given me a farm. No machines were sold until 1840, and I may say that they were not of much practical value until the improvements of my second patent, 1845. " These improvements consist in reversing the angle of the sickle-teeth alternately the improved form of the fingers to hold up the corn, &c.
Page 82 - Our farmers mny well, therefore, have been astonished by an American implement which not only reaped their wheat, but performed the work with the neatness and certainty of an old and perfect machine. Its novelty of action reminded one seeing the first engine run on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway in 1830.
Page 125 - ... out through the opening; which opening, when used in combination with vibrating blades, constitutes a claim in this improvement. My improvement extends also to the prevention of the accumulation of grass, &c ., under the blades." Claim. " I claim the opening above the blades, in combination with vibrating blades. I also claim the particular application of the flush edge at the fork of the blades, for the purpose described.
Page 205 - ... 5. Their unanimous opinion that Mr. Hussey's machine is best adapted for ridge and furrow. " 6. This question was referred by the jury to Mr. Robinson, foreman to Messrs. Bellerby, of York, a practical mechanic of acknowledged ability, whose report is appended below.
Page 97 - ... abandon it. Thereupon my attention was directed to the subject, and the same harvest I invented and put in operation, in cutting late oats on the farm of John Steele, adjoining my father's, those parts of my present reaper called the platform for receiving the corn, a straight blade taking effect on the corn, supported by stationary fingers over the edge, and a reel to gather the corn, which last, however, I found had been used before, though not in the same combination. " Although these parts...

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Obed Hussey Who, of All Inventors, Made Bread Cheap / Various
... American Reaper] OBED HUSSEY WHO, OF ALL INVENTORS, MADE BREAD CHEAP Being a true record of his life and struggles to introduce his greatest invention, ...
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JSTOR: Obed Hussey, Who, of All Inventors, Made Bread Cheap
Obed Hussey, Who, of All Inventors, Made Bread Cheap. Bulletin of the American Geographical Society, Vol. 46, No. 7, 543. 1914. ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0190-5929(1914)46%3A7%3C543%3AOHWOAI%3E2.0.CO%3B2-J

Core Historical Literature of Agriculture
Title: Obed Hussey, who, of all inventors, made bread cheap: being a true record of his life and struggles to introduce his greatest invention, the reaper, ...
chla.library.cornell.edu/ cgi/ t/ text/ text-idx?c=chla;idno=2829971

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