Mock Stars: Indie Comedy and the Dangerously Funny: Easyread Large Edition

Front Cover
Createspace Independent Pub, 2009 - Humor - 440 pages
2 Reviews
MOCK STARS TWO-DRINK MINIMUMS AND POTATO SKINS; bad Clinton jokes on late night-these used to be the hallmarks of comedy, an art relegated to the controlled environs of comedy clubs and network TV. In the late nineties, a daring breed of comedians began rejecting the status quo altogether and, by taking cues from the indie-music world, started reviving comedy as a smart and innovative art form. Mock Stars delves headfirst into this revolutionary scene, tracing the evolution of stand-up and sketch comedy from the 1970s renaissance through the 1980s boom and bust and into the progressive, tech-savvy scene of today. Combining impeccable research with witty and nuanced writing, John Wenzel profiles the major trailblazers - David Cross, Patton Oswalt, Neil Hamburger, Aimee Mann, Brian Posehn, Fred Armisen, Aziz Ansari, and many others - to reveal how comedy is becoming relevant and dangerously funny again. Andrew Earles, of famed prank-call duo Earles & Jensen, contributes a guest sidebar to further bring out the firsthand accounts and musings of the scene's members.

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Review: Mock Stars: Indie Comedy and the Dangerously Funny

User Review  - Jeff Raymond - Goodreads

A book about comedians like Patton Oswalt, Neil Hamburger, David Cross, etc.. Not essential, and the author tries to keep it light, but there's not much here for people who are ultimately already fans. Read full review

Review: Mock Stars: Indie Comedy and the Dangerously Funny

User Review  - Goodreads

A book about comedians like Patton Oswalt, Neil Hamburger, David Cross, etc.. Not essential, and the author tries to keep it light, but there's not much here for people who are ultimately already fans. Read full review

About the author (2009)

John Wenzel first got the indie-comedy bug watching HBO's Mr. Show, a sketch comedy program with which he's still obsessed. He currently writes about music, comedy, and new media for The Denver Post and has written for websites and magazines such as Rockpile and Shredding Paper.

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