The Works of Thomas Jefferson: Notes on Virginia II, Correspondence 1782-1786 (Google eBook)

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Cosimo, Inc., Jan 1, 2010 - Biography & Autobiography - 532 pages
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Few men stand with as towering a stature in the annals of American legend as THOMAS JEFFERSON (1743-1826). Author of the Declaration of Independence and third president of the United States, he ranks as one of the most significant of the United States' Founding Fathers, his political philosophies continuing to impact the nation to this day. In the late 19th century American biographer PAUL LEICESTER FORD (1865-1902) assembled this collection of Jefferson's most important, most influential, and most revealing writings. This replica of the 12-volume "Federal Edition" of 1904 is considered a masterpiece of historical scholarship, praised for its attention to detail as well as its objective dispassion toward its subject. Here, in Volume IV, discover: [ the second part of "Notes on Virginia," Jefferson's only book-length work [ correspondence and miscellaneous writings, 1783-1786 [ and much more.
  

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Contents

To James Currie January i8th S3
3
1783
121
To Washington January 22D
124
To the French Minister February 7TH
132
To Francis Eppes March 4TH
141
Proposed Constitution for Virginia June
147
To James Madison June 17TH
166
To Charles Carter October 12TH
172
Motion on Steuben April 13TH
313
Resolutions for the Legislatures of Maryland
319
To James Madison April 25TH
329
To the Governor of Virginia April 30TH
345
To the Governor of Virginia May 7TH 35
352
To James Monroe May 2ist
358
To Benjamin Franklin June ioth
365
To Charles Thomson November iith
380

To James Monroe November i8th
177
Report on Definitive Treaty December i6th
183
Resolutions Relating to British Treaty Decem
189
Report on Ceremonial for Washington December
201
To the Governor of Virginia December 31ST
207
Resolution on Definitive Treaty January 14TH
215
To the Governor of Virginia January 17TH
221
Report on Letter from John Allan January 29TH
228
Report on Committee of the States
235
Draft of Deed of Cession of Northwest Territory
249
To the Governor of Virginia March 3D
255
Instructions for Negotiating with Indians March
262
To James Madison March i6th
270
Resolves on European Treaties March
274
Report on Cession of Western Territory March
280
To George Washington March 3 ist
293
To Horatio Gates December 13TH
389
To the Governor op Virginia January i 2th
392
To James Madison March i8th
400
To James Monroe April 15TH
408
To James Monroe June 17TH
415
To Mrs John Adams June 21ST
426
To Mrs John Adams July 7TH
432
To the Governor of Virginia July 15TH
440
To Richard Price August 7TH
447
To David Hartley September sth
455
To Mary Jefferson September 20TH
461
To N and J Van Staphorst October 25TH
470
Conference with Vergennes December
481
To the Governor op Virginia January 24TH
506
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About the author (2010)

Politician, philosopher, farmer, architect, and author, Jefferson was born to Peter and Jane Randolph Jefferson on April 13, 1743, in Tuckahoe, Virginia. As Jefferson observed in his autobiography, his parents could "trace their pedigree far back in England and Scotland." At the age of 16, Thomas Jefferson entered William and Mary College; at age 24, Jefferson was admitted to the bar; at 25, he was elected to the Virginia Assembly. Renowned for his political contributions to the American colonies, and later, to the embryonic Republic, Jefferson published in 1774 A Summary View of the Rights of British America, celebrating the inalienable natural rights claimed by the colonialists. In 1775 Jefferson was elected to the Continental Congress; in 1776 he joined the five-person committee responsible for drafting the Declaration of Independence---a document that is widely regarded as being largely Jefferson's own work. In 1779 Jefferson was elected governor of the state of Virginia, and in subsequent years he distinguished himself both as a cosmopolitan international politician and as a man committed to the future of Virginia. In 1789 he was appointed U.S. secretary of state, in 1797 he served as vice president under President John Adams, and in 1801 he was elected third president of the United States. Jefferson's literary career was no less stellar than his political accomplishments. He authored tracts and books on such diverse subjects as gardening, the life of Jesus, the history of Virginia, and the practices of farming. The precise descriptions of nature that inform his Notes on the State of Virginia (1787) are frequently credited with foreshadowing the Hudson River school of aesthetics. Thomas Jefferson died on the fourth of July. His grave marker, engraved with words of his own choosing, states, "Here lies Thomas Jefferson, Author of the Declaration of American Independence, of the Statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom and Father of the University of Virginia.

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