Illustrations, Critical, Historical, Biographical, and Miscellaneous, of Novels by the Author of Waverley, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1824
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Page 438 - O eloquent, just, and mighty Death ! whom none could advise, thou hast persuaded ; what none hath dared, thou hast done ; and whom all the world hath flattered, thou only hast cast out of the world and despised...
Page 398 - No, Robin, I am not well," and then discoursed with me of her indisposition, and that her heart had been sad and heavy for ten or twelve days, and in her discourse she fetched not so few as forty or fifty great sighs.
Page 393 - That day she was dressed in white Silk, bordered with pearls of the size of beans, and over it a Mantle of black silk, shot with silver threads; her Train was very long, the end of it borne by a Marchioness; instead of a Chain, she had an oblong Collar of gold and jewels.
Page 434 - Then being asked which way he would lay himself on the block, he answered, " So the heart be right, it is no matter which way the head lies.
Page 107 - I see a column of slow-rising smoke O'ertop the lofty wood that skirts the wild. A vagabond and useless tribe there eat Their miserable meal. A kettle, slung Between two poles upon a stick transverse, Receives the morsel ; flesh obscene of dog, Or vermin, or, at best, of cock purloined From his accustomed perch.
Page 437 - I have seen all the works that are done under the sun ; and, behold, all is vanity and vexation of spirit.
Page 419 - EVEN such is time, that takes in trust Our youth, our joys, our all we have, And pays us but with age and dust ; Who in the dark and silent grave, When we have wandered all our ways, Shuts up the story of our days ; But from this earth, this grave, this dust, My God shall raise me up, I trust.
Page 394 - A gentleman entered the room bearing a rod, and along with him another who had a table-cloth, which, after they had both kneeled three times with the utmost veneration, he spread upon the table, and after kneeling again, they both retired. Then came two others, one with the rod again, the other with a...
Page 437 - Abjects, and humbles them at the instant; makes them cry, complain, and repent, yea, even to hate their forepassed happiness. He takes the account of the rich and proves him a beggar; a naked beggar which hath interest in nothing but in the gravel that fills his mouth. He holds a Glass before the eyes of the most beautiful, and makes them see therein their deformity and rottenness; and they acknowledge it.
Page 390 - ... punishment her majesty should be pleased to inflict upon me, for so great an offence. Then she sat down low upon a cushion, and I upon my knees by her, but with her own hand she gave me a cushion to lay under my knee ; which at first I refused, but she compelled me to take it. She then called for my lady Strafford out of the next chamber, for the queen was alone.

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