A New Variorum Edition of Shakespeare: A midsummer night's dreame. 1895 (Google eBook)

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J.B. Lippincott & Company, 1895
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Page 319 - That hangs his head, and a' that ? The coward-slave, we pass him by, We dare be poor for a' that ! For a' that, and a' that, Our toils obscure, and a' that ; The rank is but the guinea stamp ; The man's the gowd for a
Page 87 - Flying between the cold moon and the earth, Cupid all arm'd : a certain aim he took At a fair vestal throned by the west, And loosed his love-shaft smartly from his bow, As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts : But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaft Quench'd in the chaste beams of the watery moon, And the imperial votaress passed on, In maiden meditation, fancy-free.
Page 82 - Since once I sat upon a promontory, And heard a mermaid on a dolphin's back Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath. That the rude sea grew civil at her song, And certain stars shot madly from their spheres, To hear the sea-maid's music.
Page 209 - The best in this kind are but shadows ; and the worst are no worse, if imagination amend them.
Page 293 - When in one night, ere glimpse of morn, His shadowy flail hath thresh'd the corn That ten day-labourers could not end; Then lies him down the lubber fiend, And, stretch'd out all the chimney's length, Basks at the fire his hairy strength; And crop-full out of doors he flings, Ere the first cock his matin rings.
Page 138 - Even such a man, so faint, so spiritless, So dull, so dead in look, so woe-begone, Drew Priam's curtain in the dead of night...
Page 51 - Tis chastity, my brother, chastity: She that has that, is clad in complete steel, And like a quiver'd Nymph with Arrows keen May trace huge Forests...
Page 36 - O, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings...
Page xxiii - A new adventure him betides ; He met an Ant, which he bestrides, And post thereon away he rides, Which with his haste doth stumble, And came full over on her snout ; Her heels so threw the dirt about, For she by no means could get out, But over him doth tumble.
Page 300 - Thus Bottom's head in the play is a fantastic illusion, produced by magic spells: on the stage, it is an ass's head, and nothing more; certainly a very strange costume for a gentleman to appear in.

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