The religion of China: Confucianism and Taoism

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Free Press, 1968 - History - 308 pages
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Compares and contrasts the social and economic development of Chinese and Western societies and demonstrates the way in which Confucian and Taoist religious values inhibited the development of a capitalist economy in China. Bibliogs

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Review: The Religion of China

User Review  - Patty Chang - Goodreads

Becoming less enamored of Weber as I get older. His speculation on China seems to largely be based on some ethnographic accounts of some German traveler. Having recently read a bunch of stuff on China ... Read full review

Contents

City Prince and God
3
The Charismatic and Pontifical Position of the Central
30
Administration and Rural Structure
63
Copyright

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About the author (1968)

Max Weber, a German political economist, legal historian, and sociologist, had an impact on the social sciences that is difficult to overestimate. According to a widely held view, he was the founder of the modern way of conceptualizing society and thus the modern social sciences. His major interest was the process of rationalization, which characterizes Western civilization---what he called the "demystification of the world." This interest led him to examine the three types of domination or authority that characterize hierarchical relationships: charismatic, traditional, and legal. It also led him to the study of bureaucracy; all of the world's major religions; and capitalism, which he viewed as a productof the Protestant ethic. With his contemporary, the French sociologist Emile Durkheim---they seem not to have known each other's work---he created modern sociology.

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