America, Its Realities and Resources: Comprising Important Details Connected with the Present Social, Political, Agricultural, Commercial, and Financial State of the Country, Its Laws and Customs, Together with a Review of the Policy of the United States that Led to the War of 1812, and Peace of 1814--the "right of Search," the Texas and Oregon Questions, Etc. Etc, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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T. C. Newby, 1846 - United States
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Page x - When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bonds which have connected them with another, and to assume, among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.
Page xxx - The congress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other property belonging to the United States; and nothing in this constitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any claims of the United States, or of any particular State.
Page xxiii - The migration or importation of such persons as any of the states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the year 1808, but a tax or duty may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding 10 dollars for each person.
Page xi - He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining, in the meantime, exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.
Page xxx - State shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the junction of two or more States, or parts of States, without the consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned, as well as of the Congress.
Page xxiv - No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any duty of Tonnage, keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement or Compact with another State, or with a foreign Power, or engage in War, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of delay.
Page xxxi - Congress ; provided that no amendment which may be made prior to the year 1808, shall in any manner affect the first and fourth clauses in the ninth Section of the First Article ; and that no State, without its consent, shall be deprived of its equal suffrage in the Senate.
Page 267 - That every gift, sale or devise of land to any Minister, Public Teacher, or Preacher of the Gospel, as such, or to any Religious Sect, Order or Denomination, or to, or for the support, use or benefit of, or in trust for, any Minister, Public Teacher, or Preacher of the Gospel, as such, or any Religious Sect, Order or Denomination...
Page 67 - It being understood that all the water communications and all the usual portages along the line from Lake Superior to the Lake of the Woods, and also Grand Portage, from the shore of Lake Superior to the Pigeon River, as now actually used, shall be free and open to the use of the citizens and subjects of both countries.
Page 67 - John, or by its tributaries, of which fact reasonable evidence shall, if required, be produced, shall have free access into and through the said river and its...

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