Oprah Winfrey and the Glamour of Misery: An Essay on Popular Culture

Front Cover
Columbia University Press, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 300 pages
1 Review

Oprah Winfrey is the protagonist of the story to be told here, but this book has broader intentions, begins Eva Illouz in this original examination of how and why this talk show host has become a pervasive symbol in American culture. Unlike studies of talk shows that decry debased cultural standards and impoverished political consciousness, Oprah Winfrey and the Glamour of Misery asks us to rethink our perceptions of culture in general and popular culture in particular.

At a time when crises of morality, beliefs, value systems, and personal worth dominate both public and private spheres, Oprah's emergence as a cultural form -- the Oprah persona -- becomes clearer, as she successfully reiterates some of our most pressing moral questions. Drawing on nearly one hundred show transcripts; a year and a half of watching the show regularly; and analysis of magazine articles, several biographies,

O Magazine, Oprah Book Club novels, self-help manuals promoted on the show, and hundreds of discussions on the Oprah Winfrey Web site, Illouz takes the Oprah industry seriously, revealing it to be a multilayered "textual structure" that initiates, stages, and performs narratives of suffering and self-improvement that resonate with a wide audience and challenge traditional models of cultural analysis. This book looks closely at Oprah's method and her message, and in the process reconsiders popular culture and the tools we use to understand it.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Oprah Winfrey and the Glamour of Misery: An Essay on Popular Culture

User Review  - Margot - Goodreads

An analysis of Oprah that also aspires to offer "a comprehensive approach to culture." Reasonably successful at the first ambition, if fairly unsurprising. I prefer my pop culture analysis with the ... Read full review

Contents

II
1
III
16
IV
47
V
77
VI
120
VII
156
VIII
178
IX
206
X
236
XI
243
XII
263
XIII
293
XIV
297
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2003)

Celia Brickman maintains multiple professional roles as an independent scholar, psychotherapist and teacher. She received her doctorate at the University of Chicago, and is currently the Director of Education at the Center for Religion and Psychotherapy of Chicago.

Bibliographic information