A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life: Adapted to the State and Condition of All Orders of Christians (Google eBook)

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W. Innys and R. Manby, 1739 - Christian life - 354 pages
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Review: A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life

User Review  - Goodreads

The title of the work is very appropriate, for the call is serious and the life to which one is called devout and holy. As other reviewers have remarked, Law's style is difficult at first for the ... Read full review

Review: A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life

User Review  - Phillip - Goodreads

The title of the work is very appropriate, for the call is serious and the life to which one is called devout and holy. As other reviewers have remarked, Law's style is difficult at first for the ... Read full review

Contents

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1
II
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III
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IV
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V
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VI
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VII
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VIII
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XIII
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XIV
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XVIII
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XIX
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XII
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XXI
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XXIV
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Page 119 - Again: if you should see a man that had a large pond of water, yet living in continual thirst, not suffering himself to drink half a draught, for fear of lessening his pond; if you should see him wasting his time and strength, in fetching more water to his pond; always thirsty, yet always carrying a bucket of water in his hand, watching early and late to catch the drops of rain, gaping after every cloud, and running greedily into every mire and mud, in hopes of water, and always studying how to make...
Page 130 - Lord, I knew thee that thou art an hard man, reaping where thou hast not sown, and gathering where thou hast not strawed, and I was afraid, and went and hid thy talent in the earth: lo, there thou hast that is thine.
Page 191 - Do but so live, that your heart may truly rejoice in God, that it may feel itself affected with the praises of God; and then you will find that this state of your heart will neither want a voice nor ear to find a tune for a psalm.
Page 238 - ... under its boughs; we have all of us called it ours in our turn, though it stands, and drops its masters, as it drops its leaves. You see, my son, this wide and large firmament over our heads, where the sun and moon and all the stars appear in their turns. If you...
Page 242 - ... that is best, to live according to reason and order, and to act in every part of your life in conformity to the will of God. Study how to fill your heart full of the love of God and the love of your neighbour, and then be content to be no deeper a scholar, no finer a gentleman, than these tempers will make you.
Page 135 - The next attempt after happiness carried him into the field ; for two or three years nothing was so happy as hunting ; he entered upon it with all his soul, and leaped more hedges and ditches than had ever been known in so short a time. You never saw him but in a green coat ; he was the envy of all that blow the horn, and always spoke to his dogs in great propriety of language.
Page 169 - Here, therefore, we must fix our charge against this practice. We must blame it, not as having this or that particular evil, but as a general habit that extends itself through our whole spirit, and supports a state of mind that is wholly wrong.
Page 68 - ... for the head, in drops for the nerves, in cordials for the stomach, and in saffron for her tea. If you visit Flavia on the Sunday, you will always meet good company ; you will know what is doing in the world, you will hear the last lampoon, be told who wrote it, and who is meant by every name that is in it. You will hear what plays were acted that week, which is the finest song in the opera, who was intolerable at the last assembly, and what games are most in fashion. Flavia thinks they are atheists...
Page 68 - If you would know who is rude and ill-natured, who is vain and foppish, who lives too high, and who is in debt: If you would know what is the quarrel at a certain house, or who and who are in love: If you would know how late Belinda comes home at night, what...
Page 8 - Christianity ; they are not ours unless they be the virtues and tempers of our ordinary life. So that Christianity is so far from leaving us to live in the common ways of life, conforming to the folly of customs, and gratifying the passions and tempers which the spirit of the world delights in, it is so far from indulging us in any of these things, that all its virtues which it makes necessary to salvation are only so many ways of living above, and contrary to, the world...

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