Night Comes to the Cretaceous: Comets, Craters, Controversy, and the Last Days of the Dinosaurs

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Sep 23, 1999 - Science - 272 pages
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What killed the dinosaurs? For more than a century, this question has been one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in science. But, in 1980, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Luis Alvarez and his son, Walter, proposed a radical answer: 65 million years ago an asteroid or comet as big as Mt. Everest slammed into the earth, raising a dust cloud vast enough to cause mass extinction. A revolutionary idea that challenged the ice-age extinction theory, the asteroid-impact theory was scorned and derided by the science community. But after years of bitter debate and intense research, an astonishing discovery was made-an immense impact crater in the Yucatán Peninsula that was identified as Ground Zero. The Alvarezes had their proof. A dramatic scientific detective story, Night Comes to the Cretaceous is a brilliant example of science at work-in the trenches, complete with passionate struggles and occasional victories.

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Contents

DISCOVERY
3
THE PAST AS KEY TO THE PRESENT
23
STONES FROM THE SKY
35
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

James Lawrence Powell, Executive Director of the National PhJames Lawrence Powell, Executive Director of the National Physical Science Consortium at the University of Southern Caliysical Science Consortium at the University of Southern California, is author of "Grand Canyon: Solving Earth's Grandestfornia, is author of "Grand Canyon: Solving Earth's Grandest Puzzle, "among other books. Puzzle, "among other books.

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