The Asiatic Annual Register, Or, A View of the History of Hindustan, and of the Politics, Commerce and Literature of Asia, Volume 6 (Google eBook)

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Lawrence Dundas Campbell, E. Samuel
J. Debrett, 1806 - Books
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Page 119 - The detachment consists of one regiment of European and three regiments of native cavalry, two regiments of European and six battalions of native infantry, with a due proportion of artillery, amounting altogether to 1500 cavalry and 6,800 infantry; and to that force was added 2,500 of his Highness the Rajah of Mysore's horse.
Page 15 - It is possible indeed, that by incessant labour and irksome attendance at the bar, I might in due time have attained all that my very limited ambition could aspire to; but in no other station than that which I owe to your friendship, could I have gratified at once my boundless curiosity concerning the people of the East, continued the exercise of my profession, in which I sincerely delight, and enjoyed at the same time...
Page 6 - It supposes the absence of all fear of human justice, and bids defiance also to all human laws ; it supposes also either a contempt for public opinion, or, what is worse, a state of society which has ceased to brand with disgrace actions that ought to be infamous : it is an attack on religion and law in the very point of their union.
Page 59 - ... surgeons. The furlough to be granted by the Commander-in-Chief at each Presidency, with the approbation of the respective governments. " Officers who have not served ten years in India, but whose presence in England is required by urgent private affairs, may be allowed...
Page 11 - I am firmly attached, both from early habits, and from mature reason ; from ancient affection unchanged for a single moment, and from a full conviction that such affection was well placed. The views and wishes of all other men I will analyse and weigh, with that suspicion and slowness of belief, which my experience, such as it is, has taught me : and to be more particular, although I will be jealous of the regal part of our constitution, and always lend an arm towards restraining its proud waves...
Page 11 - ... they are, no less than playing on a musical instrument, or handling a pencil : and as the best musicians and finest painters began with playing sometimes out of tune, and drawing out of proportion, so the greatest orators must begin with leaving some periods unfinished, and perhaps with sitting down in the middle of a sentence. It is only by continued use, that a speaker learns to express his ideas with precision and soundness, and to...
Page 16 - After the prizes and honorary rewards had been distributed, the hon'ble the visitor was pleased to deliver the following speech : " GENTLEMEN OF THE COLLEGE OF FORT WILLIAM, By that awful dispensation of Providence which has deprived the British Nation, and the British Empire in India, of the public...
Page 108 - ... peace between our two countries ought to diffuse through both, lead us to participate in the pleasure which the birth of a princess must naturally give to the royal family and people of Great Britain ; and we sincerely congratulate their majesties on that addition to their domestic happiness. We have the honor to be with great regard and esteem, sir, your most obedient and very humble servants, J.
Page 96 - Sessera, and connected with the western bank by a bridge of sixteen arches. In the western stream, which he considered to be an artificial one, were a surprising multitude of various apartments, constructed on a level with the water, and in the midst of it, the water being conveyed round them in various channels into reservoirs contrived for its reception, whence...
Page 184 - Matters in general have a good appearance. I think they all will end as you wish. The combined chiefs, of whom we have heard so much, have allowed us to come quietly, and take our station at this place ; and, notwithstanding their threats, have taken no one step to impede our march, or to divert our attention to other objects. Here we are now in force, in a position from which nothing can drive us, and in which we shall gain strength daily. On the other hand, they have not yet made peace among themselves;...

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